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All Countries - Euro Coins

The European Central Bank

Though neither a country nor a coin issuer, the ECB is responsible for the Euro. This part of the ECI website has a page of FAQ's specifically aimed at the collector. For more information such as: the history of the Euro and the ECB and to view images of all the coin and banknote designs, go to the site of the European Central Bank.
 
What is the Euro?
 
The Euro is the new currency created by the 15 member states of the European Union (EU). The Euro is now being used in 12 of these countries. The currency was put into full circulation in 2002. 
 
2. Which are the 12 Member States participating in the Euro?
 
Austria, Belgium, Germany, Greece, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Spain, Portugal. In 2007, Slovenia became the 13th country to introduce the euro.
 
3. Which European countries have not adopted the Euro?
 
There are three: Britain, Denmark and Sweden which are waiting to see if they like the new Euro currency and its global and national economic mechanics.
 
4. Where is the Euro being used?
 
All currency transactions within the 13 member states are expressed in euros. In European countries that are not currently using the euro the respective national currency is used and often the equivalent expressed in euros as well.
 
5. When will bank notes and coins denominated in Euros start to be used?
 
The first official legal tender Euros, collector and circulating, paper and coins began to circulate on January 2002. Slovenia introduced the euro on 1 January 2007.
 
6. For the 12 nations which will issue Euros in 2002, what will be the last year of issue for their collector coin sets?
 
Country Year
Austria 2001
Belgium 2001
Germany 2001
Greece 2000
Finland 2001
France 2001
Ireland 2000
Italy 2001
Luxembourg 1995
Netherlands 2001
Spain 2001
Portugal 2001
 
7. What happened to the national coins and banknotes from each Member State when the Euro currency is physically put into circulation as of January 1, 2002?
 
During the first six months of 2002, as the new Euros are entering circulation, the national currencies will be within drawn from circulation during the normal course of business. Each Member State had different exchange policies and different authorities accepting the returned pieces. Austria, for example, has decided to take back schillings in perpetuity through the national banking system. Other member states have restricted this time.
 
8. What do the Euro coins look like? 
 
Each denomination of Euro coinage, regardless of the country of minting and issue, will have a common obverse design, i.e. a map of Europe with a graphic representation of the European stars, along with the coins denomination. These three elements will be depicted on the European side of each coin, but will differ in size and location according to the face value of the respective coin.
 
The other side, or reverse, of each coin has a representation from the Member State that struck and issued the coin.
 
Regardless of which Member State minted the coin, these coins circulate freely throughout the thirteen Member States.
 
9. Are the collector Euros any different from the circulating coins, and if so, in what way?
 
Most Euro-issuing countries will have limited edition commemorative coins denominated in Euros, but different from the circulating coins. The legal tender acceptance of these commemorative coins will be similar to the pre-Euro issues.
 
 
Privacy Policy European Union 2002 - 96 Coin "Bankers Set"
 
 
During the planning phase for the introduction of the Euro, the banking system in Spain - and likely others too - requested that complete sets of Euros be made available to its banks as a means of helping to educate their employees. This was the origin of the 96 coin set (12 countries x 8 coins) which ECI has chosen to name the "Bankers Set".
 
This set is comprised of 12 different holders, one for each country. The appearance of each holder is similar to the Mint Masters Set. The 12 sets are contained in an attractive colored box.
 
PLEASE BE AWARE THAT THIS IS THE ONLY OFFICIAL SET OF EURO COINS PRODUCED CO-OPERATIVELY BY THE MINTS OF THE EURO ZONE. ALL OTHER SETS OF 96 COINS ARE BEING PRODUCED PRIVATELY.
 
European Union 2002 Pan-European 12 Coin "Mint Masters Set"
 
2002 Pan-European 12 Coin "Mint Masters Set"
This set presents the 1 Euro coin from each of the 12 countries:
Each coin has a common obverse while the reverses are unique to each country. To see more detailed images of the coins themselves, go to:
Euro Coin Info from the ECB
 
Also making this set very interesting is the fact that the dates of the coins in this set are not all 2002. The reason for this is as follows. Most countries began to strike coins as early as 1999 in order to stock pile them and thus be ready for the introduction of the Euro in January 2002. Some countries decided that the dates on coins struck in 1999, 2000 and 2001 would be the actual year in which they were struck while others decided to date all coins for the year of issue (2002) regardless of the year in which they were struck. The sets that we have examined have dates as follows:
 
1999 - Belgium
2000 - Finland
2001 - France, Netherlands, Spain
2002 - Austria, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Portugal
 
This set marks an immensely important milestone in the history of the world's monetary system. As such it is both a "must-have" for any coin collection as well as a unique gift.

All Countries - Euro Coins

The European Central Bank

Though neither a country nor a coin issuer, the ECB is responsible for the Euro. This part of the ECI website has a page of FAQ's specifically aimed at the collector. For more information such as: the history of the Euro and the ECB and to view images of all the coin and banknote designs, go to the site of the European Central Bank.
 
What is the Euro?
 
The Euro is the new currency created by the 15 member states of the European Union (EU). The Euro is now being used in 12 of these countries. The currency was put into full circulation in 2002. 
 
2. Which are the 12 Member States participating in the Euro?
 
Austria, Belgium, Germany, Greece, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Spain, Portugal. In 2007, Slovenia became the 13th country to introduce the euro.
 
3. Which European countries have not adopted the Euro?
 
There are three: Britain, Denmark and Sweden which are waiting to see if they like the new Euro currency and its global and national economic mechanics.
 
4. Where is the Euro being used?
 
All currency transactions within the 13 member states are expressed in euros. In European countries that are not currently using the euro the respective national currency is used and often the equivalent expressed in euros as well.
 
5. When will bank notes and coins denominated in Euros start to be used?
 
The first official legal tender Euros, collector and circulating, paper and coins began to circulate on January 2002. Slovenia introduced the euro on 1 January 2007.
 
6. For the 12 nations which will issue Euros in 2002, what will be the last year of issue for their collector coin sets?
 
Country Year
Austria 2001
Belgium 2001
Germany 2001
Greece 2000
Finland 2001
France 2001
Ireland 2000
Italy 2001
Luxembourg 1995
Netherlands 2001
Spain 2001
Portugal 2001
 
7. What happened to the national coins and banknotes from each Member State when the Euro currency is physically put into circulation as of January 1, 2002?
 
During the first six months of 2002, as the new Euros are entering circulation, the national currencies will be within drawn from circulation during the normal course of business. Each Member State had different exchange policies and different authorities accepting the returned pieces. Austria, for example, has decided to take back schillings in perpetuity through the national banking system. Other member states have restricted this time.
 
8. What do the Euro coins look like? 
 
Each denomination of Euro coinage, regardless of the country of minting and issue, will have a common obverse design, i.e. a map of Europe with a graphic representation of the European stars, along with the coins denomination. These three elements will be depicted on the European side of each coin, but will differ in size and location according to the face value of the respective coin.
 
The other side, or reverse, of each coin has a representation from the Member State that struck and issued the coin.
 
Regardless of which Member State minted the coin, these coins circulate freely throughout the thirteen Member States.
 
9. Are the collector Euros any different from the circulating coins, and if so, in what way?
 
Most Euro-issuing countries will have limited edition commemorative coins denominated in Euros, but different from the circulating coins. The legal tender acceptance of these commemorative coins will be similar to the pre-Euro issues.
 
 
Privacy Policy European Union 2002 - 96 Coin "Bankers Set"
 
 
During the planning phase for the introduction of the Euro, the banking system in Spain - and likely others too - requested that complete sets of Euros be made available to its banks as a means of helping to educate their employees. This was the origin of the 96 coin set (12 countries x 8 coins) which ECI has chosen to name the "Bankers Set".
 
This set is comprised of 12 different holders, one for each country. The appearance of each holder is similar to the Mint Masters Set. The 12 sets are contained in an attractive colored box.
 
PLEASE BE AWARE THAT THIS IS THE ONLY OFFICIAL SET OF EURO COINS PRODUCED CO-OPERATIVELY BY THE MINTS OF THE EURO ZONE. ALL OTHER SETS OF 96 COINS ARE BEING PRODUCED PRIVATELY.
 
European Union 2002 Pan-European 12 Coin "Mint Masters Set"
 
2002 Pan-European 12 Coin "Mint Masters Set"
This set presents the 1 Euro coin from each of the 12 countries:
Each coin has a common obverse while the reverses are unique to each country. To see more detailed images of the coins themselves, go to:
Euro Coin Info from the ECB
 
Also making this set very interesting is the fact that the dates of the coins in this set are not all 2002. The reason for this is as follows. Most countries began to strike coins as early as 1999 in order to stock pile them and thus be ready for the introduction of the Euro in January 2002. Some countries decided that the dates on coins struck in 1999, 2000 and 2001 would be the actual year in which they were struck while others decided to date all coins for the year of issue (2002) regardless of the year in which they were struck. The sets that we have examined have dates as follows:
 
1999 - Belgium
2000 - Finland
2001 - France, Netherlands, Spain
2002 - Austria, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Portugal
 
This set marks an immensely important milestone in the history of the world's monetary system. As such it is both a "must-have" for any coin collection as well as a unique gift.

EURO COINS

All Countries – 19 X 2 Euro collection 2016

Collection of 19 commemorative 2 euro coins 2016 from 12 eurozone countries.

Price: 74,00 €
All Countries – 27 X 2 Euro collection 2015

Collection of 27 coins of 2 euro issued in 2015 from 11 eurozone countries.

Price: 99,00 €
All Countries – 17 X 2 euro 10 Years EURO, 2012

The complete collection of 17 coins, including one coin issued by Germany and 16 coins issued by each one of the other countries. Each coin is placed in separate coin holder.

Price: 69,00 €
All Countries – 20 X 2 euro, 10 years EMU, 2009

The complete collection of 20 coins, including the 5 coins issued by the 5 German mints and 15 coins issued by each one of the other countries.Each coin is placed in separate coin holder

Price: 95,00 €