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Euro coins - Euros

Euro coins - Euros for all European countries  Commemorative – collector euro coins  The introduction of euro coins in January 2002 has generated a variety of coin designs. The euro area countries have put euro coins in circulation with distinctive national symbols on their obverse side. The diversity of the coins' national sides is enhanced with the issuance of commemorative and collector coins by euro area countries.  Numismatic Programme 2016  Commemorative euro coins  Collector coins – Special series Medals List of Greek commemorative and collector euro coins Commemorative euro coins  Commemorative coins are another coin category officially issued by euro area countries.  Each Member State whose currency is the euro may only issue two commemorative coins per year. Exceptionally, they are allowed to issue a third, provided that it is one issued jointly by all euro countries and that it commemorates events of Europe-wide importance. All commemorative euro coins are intended for circulation.  Commemorative coins, which can only be  2 euro denomination coins, are legal tender throughout the euro area. This means that they can be used – and must be accepted – just like any other euro coin.  These coins have the same features and properties and the same common side as normal  2  euro coins. What makes them different is their commemorative design on the national side which commemorates a historical event or a person. Commemorative coins jointly issued by all euro countries use a common design on the national side, showing the name of the issuing country as well as the event commemorated in the respective language(s).  The very first commemorative euro coin was issued in 2004 by Greece on the occasion of the Athens Olympic Games.  Four commemorative coins have been issued jointly by all euro countries:  in March 2007, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, the design was selected following a competition organized by national mints in January 2009, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Economic and Monetary Union, the winning design, selected by the public via an online vote, was created by Mr. Georgios Stamatopoulos, professional designer at the Bank of Greece  in January 2012, to commemorate ten years of euro banknotes and coins, the winning design, selected by the public via an online vote, was created by Mr. Helmut Andexlinger, professional designer at the Austrian Mint and  in July 2015, to celebrate thirty years of the EU flag, the winning design, selected by the public via an online vote, was created by Mr. Georgios Stamatopoulos, professional designer at the Bank of Greece.  Collector euro coins  Collector euro coins are officially issued by euro area countries, have a nominal value (face value) and are legal tender, but are not intended for circulation. The face value and the designs of collector coins are always different than those of euro circulation coins.  While euro circulation coins are legal tender throughout the euro area, euro collector coins are legal tender only in their country of issuance. They are rarely used for payment purposes, because their market value is usually much higher than their nominal value and many of them are made out of precious metals such as gold or silver.  To avoid causing confusion to the public, the technical specifications of collector coins are different from those of circulation coins. At least two out of the three technical parameters, namely colour, diameter and weight, need to be different from those of euro circulation coins.  common side


All coins have a common reverse side showing how much the coin is worth, with a design by Belgian designer Luc Luycx. The design of the 1-, 2-, and 5-cent coins symbolises Western Europe's place in the world as a whole.

The coins were minted in several of the participating countries, many using blanks produced at Birmingham Mint, Birmingham, England.

Current design

In 2007, a new design was introduced to reflect the enlargement in 2004. The design still retains all elements of the original designs, including the twelve stars, however the map of the fifteen states is replaced by one showing the whole of Europe 'as a continent' without borders. The vertical ridges only appear over the 'sea'.

Cyprus is shown several kilometres north west of its real position in order to include it on the map. The original proposal from the European Commission was to include Turkey on the map, however this design was rejected by Council. This was seen as a political snub by the Council to Turkey's EU membership ambitions.

The first issue of these coins were minted in 2006, by the Mint of Finland ltd, for the Slovenian euro coins. These coins came into circulation in 2007 and will be compulsory for existing members to issue from 2008 onwards. The one, two and five cent coins remained unchanged with the Commission stating that they remained unaffected as they show Europe's place in the world, even though the EU 15 are still highlighted on the map.

The original designs of the 10-, 20-, and 50-cent coins showed the outline of each of the EU-15 member states. This meant that each state was shown as separate from the others, though, thus giving Europe an appearance of being formed of many islands. EU members which were not part of the eurozone (the United Kingdom, Sweden and Denmark) were also depicted.

On the €1 and €2 coins, the landmass appeared more cohesive although borders were indicated. The vertical ridges also passed through some non-participating countries. As in current issues, all coins featured 12 stars in their design. Pre-2007 issues are legal tender throughout the eurozone, including new member Slovenia.

The year featured in the coins can date back to 1999, when the currency was formally established (only on French, Spanish, Belgian, Finnish and Dutch coins print 1999). These countries traditionally put on the coin the year when it was minted rather than the year in which it was put into circulation.


National sides

The obverse side varies from state to state, with each member allowed to choose their own design. Each of the eight coins can have the same design (such as Belgian coins), or can vary from each coin (such as Italian coins). In Monarchies, the national side usually features a portrait of the country's monarch, often in a design carried over from the former currency (such as Belgian coins). Republics tend to feature national monuments, symbols or stylised designs (such as French coins). Engravings on the edge of the two euro coin is also subject to national choice.

There are however some restrictions on the design, it must include twelve stars, the engravers initials and the year of issue. New issues must also include the name of the issuing country. It can't repeat the denomination of the coin or the word euro unless it is in a different alphabet (such as on Greek coins). The national side is also restricted from changing until the end of 2008, unless a monarch depicted on a coin dies or abdicates (such as in the case of the Vatican's coins). Following 2004, states could also produce one €2 commemorative coin a year in limited numbers.

There are at present no plans to abolish the national designs in favour of a European one. However the Commission has proposed that the one, two and five cent coins have a common design to keep down costs. Also, in 2007, all eurozone countries issued a near-identical commemorative coin to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the signature of the Treaties of Rome. These coins had the same design except for the name of the country and the language of the text used.

Though they are not members of the EU, Monaco, San Marino and Vatican City also have euro coins featuring a national side, but these only occasionally end up in general circulation as their scarcity leads to greater interest from coin collectors. Andorra is currently in talks to mint its own coin design.

Small-denomination coins

The one and two cent coins were initially introduced in order to ensure that the introduction of the euro was not used as an excuse by retailers to heavily round up prices. However, due to the cost of maintaining a circulation of low value coins, by business and the mints, Finland and the Netherlands have rounded up prices to the nearest five cents (Swedish rounding) while producing only a handful of those coins for collectors, rather than general circulation.

Despite this, the coins are still legal tender and produced outside these states, so if a customer with one cent coin minted elsewhere wishes to pay with it, they may. However, as the amount of non-national coinage in an EU member state is generally much lower than the amount of nationally-minted coinage, the number of 1- and 2-cent coins in circulation will be marginal and thus of little consequence to retailers.

The Finnish law, to round to five cents and not provide change in anything less, was issued in January 2002 before the coins were put into circulation. The Netherlands followed suit in September 2004 with Belgium making moves to in 2005. The Netherlands did so under pressure from retail businesses, who have claimed that dealing with 1- and 2-cent coins is too expensive. After a successful experiment in the city of Woerden in May 2004, retailers in the whole of the Netherlands have been permitted to round cash transactions to the nearest five cent amount since September 2004.

This is in part due to factors such as rising metal prices: The De Nederlandsche Bank calculated it would save $36 million a year by not using the smaller coins. Other countries such as Germany favoured retaining the coins due to their desired for 1.99 euro prices, which appears more attractive to the consumer than a 2 euro price. This is echoed by the European Central Bank itself which support the coins stating it allows businesses to calculate prices more exactly to attract consumers, such as 99 cents. According to a Eurobarometer survey of EU citizens, Germans are most sceptical about the removal of the one and two cents coins from complete circulation in the eurozone, however on average there is a majority for their removal (58% for the one cent coin and 52% for the two cent - in 2005). The Belgians are most supportive of their removal.

The 1, 2 and 5 cent coins account for approximately 80% of all new coins minted in the Eurozone. Due to the expense of producing such low value coinage, the Commission with some member states have proposed that costs could be cut by having a common design on both sides of these coins, rather than minting numerous different designs.
Features for persons with impaired sight

Euro coins were designed in cooperation with organisations representing blind persons, and as a result they incorporate many features allowing them to be distinguished by touch alone. In addition, their visual appearance is designed to make them easy to tell apart for persons who cannot read the actual inscriptions on the coins.

The coins increase in size and weight with value. Of the eight denominations of euro coins, the three lowest denominations are small and distinctly reddish in colour, and quite thin and light. The next three denominations are yellow in colour and thicker, as well as heavier. The highest two denominations are each of two different colours, and are generally larger and thicker than the lower denominations.

In general, the greater the value, the heavier the coin; and the greater the value, the larger the coin. Reddish colour identifies low values; yellow colour identifies medium values; two different colours identify high values.

* The one-cent coin is the smallest of all coins, and size is probably the best way to identify the coin. Its diameter is about the size of the thumb-nail of an average adult. The edge of the coin is smooth, and the coin is copper in colour.

* The two-cent coin is slightly larger than the one-cent coin and is of the same copper colour. It incorporates a distinctive groove running circumferentially around the edge of the coin; this groove can be felt easily by running the finger tip or a fingernail across the edge of the coin; the groove gives the visual and tactile impression that it consists of two coins pressed into one, though this is not the case.

* The five-cent coin is also copper in colour, and is the largest of the copper coins, but only slightly larger than the two-cent coin. It has a smooth edge.

* The ten-cent coin is gold in colour. It is very slightly smaller than a five-cent piece, but it is much thicker, and it has a coarse serration around the edge. It is heavier than any of the copper coins.

* The twenty-cent coin is larger than the ten-cent coin and is also gold in colour. It has a unique group of seven notches (forming a spanish flower shape) around its otherwise-smooth edge, making it easy to recognise by touch.

* The fifty-cent coin is also gold in colour and is noticeably thicker, heavier, and larger than the coins of smaller denominations, and it also has a coarsely serrated edge.

* The one-euro coin has a silver interior and a gold perimeter. The edge is distinctively marked with alternating smooth and finely serrated sections. It is of about the same thickness and weight as the fifty-cent piece, but its edge markings readily distinguish it from that coin.

* The two-euro coin is of the same colours as the one-euro coin, but they are reversed: the perimeter is silver, and the interior is gold. It has the largest diameter of any euro coin. Its edge has a fine, continuous serration. The edge is also embossed with stars and letters differing between nations, but this is difficult to detect by touch, and may not be necessary in order to distinguish it from other coins, given its size.

Although there have been other currencies predating the euro that were specifically designed in similar ways (different sizes, colours, and ridges) to aid the visually impaired, the introduction of the euro constitutes the first time that authorities have consulted associations representing the blind before, rather than after, the release of the currency.

Commemorative issues

Each state allowed to issue coins may also mint one commemorative coin each year. Only two euro coins maybe used in this way (for them to be legal tender) and there is a limit on the amount that can be issued. However the coin must show the normal design criteria, such as the twelve stars, the year and the issuing country.

Greece was the first country to issue a commemorative coin, and was followed by all but France, the Netherlands, Ireland and Slovenia. However in 2007 every eurozone state participated in the Treaty of Rome programme, where all member states issued a coin of similar design to commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Rome (difference being the name of the issuing country and the language of the text).

This may be repeated in 2009 in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of the introduction of the euro. Since 2006, Germany has been issuing a series of coins, the German Bundeslander series, showing each of the states of Germany on its coins between 2006 and 2021. Common programmes such as the Treaty of Rome and euro anniversary do not count as a state's yearly issue.
Gold and silver commemorative issues

A legacy of old national practice is the minting of silver and gold commemorative coins. Unlike normal issues, these coins are not legal tender in all the Eurozone, but only in the country where the coin was issued. For instance, a €10 Finnish commemorative coin cannot be used in the Netherlands.

Despite this, these coins are not really intended to be used as means of payment, as their scrap value generally vastly exceeds their face value, so it does not constitute a serious problem. The major exception is Germany, where silver ten euro commemoratives are available at banks and some retailers at face value. The coins, however, generally do not circulate.

It is uncertain whether the Council of Ministers will grant them legal tender status elsewhere outside national boundaries, as San Marino, Monaco and Vatican City also issue these kind of coins.

Euro coins,  euro coin sets  2014. Euro coin issues from 18 Euro zone countries.  Euro coins Vatican, Euro coins Monaco, Euro coins San Marino.  2 Euros,  1 Euro.   Images of Euro Coins - 1 Euro coin -  which country euro coins are from.   Euro coins,   Slovenian euro coin -  These coins came into circulation in 2007.  Cypriot euro coins - Cypriot euro coins feature three separate designs for the three series of coins. Cyprus has been a member of the European Union since 1 May 2004. Eurocoins.  Eurocoins from all countries.  Unc sets, BU  sets and proof sets, starter kits, commemorative silver and gold coins. Κέρματα Ευρώ,  κέρματα Ευρώ από όλες τις χώρες The Euro Coins,  euro area.  The euro coin series comprises eight different denominations. The euro coins - Greek Euro coins - 2 Euros, 1 Euro,  50 euro cents,  20 euro cents,  10 euro cents,   5 euro cents,  2 euro cents and  1 euro cent. The design of the euro coins:  Euro coins have one common side and one national side. They can be used anywhere within the euro area, regardless of the country of issue. France - Euro coins, Official BU Set 2014 Includes coins of 1c-2c-5c-10c-20c-50c-1euro-2euro denominations with 2014 Yeardate. 1 Euro and 50 Cent denominations exclusively available in the BU and Proof Mintsets. Benelux - Official BU Set 2014 This special set contains eight Brilliant Uncirculated (BU) coins issued in 2014 by the three Benelux countries, Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg. Germany - Official BU Set (A,D,F,G,J) 2014 The Official BU Euro coins issued in 2014 by the 5 German mints. Each set contains the 2 Euro commemorative coin 2014, St. Michael, Lower Saxony. Germany - Official Coin set BU 2014 The Official BU Euro coins issued in 2014. It contains also the 2 Euro commemorative coin 2014, St. Michael, Lower Saxony. Ireland - Euro coins, Official BU Set 2014 2014 Annual Mint Set. This 2014 Uncirculated Euro Coin Set pays tribute to Ireland’s proud maritime heritage. Latvia - Euro coins, Official BU Set 2014 The first official Euro coins of Latvia, 1 cent to 2 Euro 2014 in BU quality. Lavia has been the 18th country of Euro zone area since 1st January 2014. Latvia - Euro Coins, Complete UNC set 2014 The first Euro coins of Latvia, 1 cent to 2 Euro 2014 in UNC quality. Lavia has been the 18th country of Euro zone area since 1st January 2014. Luxemburg - Complete UNC Euro set 2014 The eight Luxemburg Euro denominations 2014 in UNC quality, placed in Euro coins folder. Austria - Euro coins, Official BU set 2014 This Brilliant Uncirculated Euro coins set from Austria contains all eight of the 2014-dated Euro coins. Belgium - Official BU Set, king Philip, 2014 The official Belgian Euro coin set BU 2014. Contains the coins from 1 cent to 2 Euro 2014 in BU quality + medal with the image of king Philip and queen Mathilde. The coin set is dedicated to the coronation of king Philip. Portugal - Official BU Set 2014 The official 2014 BU issue from the Portuguese Mint, the Casa de Moeda. Portugal - Official FDC Set 2014 The Official FDC Portuguese 2014 eurocoins set. Portugal - Official BABY Set 2014 The official 2014 BABY set from the Portuguese Mint, the Casa de Moeda. Netherlands - Official coin set BU, Willem Alexander, 2014 Official Euro coins set (Brilliant Uncirculated) of Netherlands, 2014 with the portrait of the new King Willem Alexander. Luxemburg - Official BU Set 2014 The 2014 BU Set contains one coin of each of the 8 denominations and the commemorative 2 Euro coin of 2014, Independence. The 2014 coin set is dedicated to the City of Dudelange. Vatican - Official Euro coin set 2014 The eight Vatican Εuro coins 2014 in Brilliant Uncirculated quality. The first coin set with the portrait of Pope Francis. Vatican - Official Euro coin set Proof 2014 + 20 EURO Ag 2014 Euro Coin Set - PROOF Version 8 coins (1 cent, 2 cent, 5 cent, 10 cent, 20 cent, 50 cent, 1 euro, 2 euro) with Silver coin 20 Euro, dedicated to Pope John XXIII, Ag 925/1000, weight 26g, diameter 36mm. Netherlands - Complete UNC Set, Willem Alexander, 2014 Complete Euro coins set of Netherlands, 2014. Official introduction set with the portrait of the new King Willem Alexander. Finland - Euro coins, Official BU Set 2014 The theme of Mint of Finland’s first coinage of the year is the Isokari lighthouse. The 2014 coinage includes all Finnish metal circulation coins for 2014 and the Isokari mint medal.  2 Euro 2014, Commemorative 2 Euro 2014, Euro coins UNC, new euro coins, Euro coins of all countries, 2 Euro Vatican, 2 Euro San Marino. €2 commemorative coins are special euro coins minted and issued by member states of the eurozone since 2004 as legal tender in all eurozone member states. Only the national obverse sides of the coins differ; the common reverse sides do not. The coins typically commemorate the anniversaries of historical events or draw attention to current events of special importance. Portugal – 2 Euro, the Carnation Revolution, 2014 Portugal, commemorative coin 2 Euro 2014, 40th Anniversary of the Carnation Revolution. Italy – 2 Euro BU, 200 years Carabinieri, 2014 (in blister) Italian 2 Euro coin 2014 to commemorate the 200th Anniversary of the establishment of Italian police, Carabinieri 1814-2014. Quality brilliant Uncirculated in blister. Slovakia – 2 Euro, accession to the EU, 2014 Commemorative coin in nominal value of 2 Euro. Slovakia's accession to the European Union, 10th anniversary. Slovakia – 2 Euro, accession to the EU, 2014 (coin card) Commemorative coin in nominal value of 2 Euro. Slovakia's accession to the European Union, 10th anniversary. Mintage: 7000 pcs, numbered! Spain – 2 Euro, Antoni Gaudí's Park Güell, 2014 The 2 Euro commemorative coin of Spain 2014. UNESCO's World Heritage series celebrating the Work of Antoni Gaudí. Luxemburg - 2 Euro, 175 years of independence, 2014 Commemorative 2 Euro coin 2014, dedicated to the 175 years of independence of Luxemburg. Luxemburg - 2 Euro, Independence, 2014 (coin card) Commemorative 2 Euro coin 2014, dedicated to the 175 years of independence of Luxemburg. Latvia - 2 Euro UNC, Latvian folk maiden, 2014 The first 2 Euro coin of Latvia 2014 in UNC quality. Latvia is he 18th country of Euro zone area since 1st January 2014. The 2 Euro coin features a Latvian folk maiden. Germany – 2 Euro, St. Michael, Lower Saxony, 2014 (A,D,F,G,J) The new commemorative 2 Euro coin of Germany 2014, which belongs to the German Bundeslander series, shows the Church of St. Michael in Hildesheim, Lower Saxony. Germany – 2 Euro, St. Michael, Lower Saxony, 2014 The new commemorative 2 Euro coin of Germany 2014, which belongs to the German Bundeslander series, shows the Church of St. Michael in Hildesheim, Lower Saxony. Luxembourg 175th Anniversary of the Foundation of Luxembourg's Independence The coin depicts on the right hand side of its inner part the effigy of His Royal Highness, the Grand-Duke Henri, looking to the right, and on the left hand side of its inner part, vertically positioned, the years ‘1839’ and ‘2014’ and the name of the issuing country ‘LËTZEBUERG’. The inscriptions ‘ONOFHÄNGEGKEET’ and ‘175 Joër’ appear at the bottom of the inner part of the coin. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Germany St. Michael's Church in Hildesheim, Lower Saxony. Spain Park Güell, Work of Antoni Gaudí. Fifth of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites series The coin depicts in the foreground a lizard sculpture which is the Park Güell emblem and was designed by the architect Antoni Gaudí. As background a detail of one of the pavilions situated at the Park Güell entrance. At the top, in circular sense and in capital letters the words ‘ESPAÑA’ and ‘PARK GÜELL — GAUDÍ’. At the left the year of issuance ‘2014’ and at the right the mintmark. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Slovakia 10 Years of Slovakian Membership in European Union Belgium 100 Years since the Beginning of World War I Portugal 40 Years since the Carnation Revolution The two curves represent the general shape of a carnation, the flower symbolizing the movement, which was also the origin of the revolution’s name. The name of the issuing country ‘PORTUGAL’ and the Coat of Arms are inscribed on the top of the flower. The center of the image shows the date of the event ‘25 DE ABRIL’ (25th April) and at the bottom is written the number of years past since the revolution ‘40 ANOS’(40 years) and the year of issuance ‘2014’. The shape of the letters and numbers is inspired on those used in posters and other political information supports 40 years ago, as a symbol of the euphoric period lived right after the event. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Netherlands King Willem-Alexander and Princess Beatrix San Marino 500th Anniversary since the Death of Donato Bramante Malta Independence from Britain in 1964 France 70 Years since D-Day Finland 100 Years since the Birth of Tove Jansson Malta 200th Anniversary of the Malta Police Force Finland 150th Anniversary of Finish Coining San Marino 90th Anniversary since the Death of Giacomo Puccini Belgium 150 Years Belgium Red Cross Latvia Riga, cultural Capital of Europe The central image of the coin shows the skyline of Riga and the historic centre of the city that has been included in the list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites. At the top of the image, the inscription ‘EIROPAS KULTURAS GALVASPILSETA’ (European capital of culture) and at the bottom the name of the celebrated city and the year of issuance ‘RIGA — 2014’, and underneath the indication of the issuing country ‘LV’. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Italy 450th Years since the Birth of Galileo Galilei Greece 400 Years since the Death of El Greco Greece 150th Anniversary of the Union of the Ionian Islands with Greece Slovenia 600th Anniversary since the Coronation of Barbara of Celje The central image of the coin shows, with lined pattern, the portrait of the Queen Barbara of Celje with her sceptre. On the image are placed three typical six-pointed stars of Celje counts. On the left side of the portrait is the inscription ‘SLOVENIJA’ and on the right side the inscription ‘BARBARA CELJSKA’ and the years ‘1414-2014’. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. France World AIDS Day Portugal International Year of Family Farming Description: On the central part of the design are represented tools typically used in the traditional agriculture, together with farming products: a chicken in the center, surrounded by pumpkins, a basket of potatoes, and other vegetables and flowers. On the left side, in semi-circle, the subject of the commemoration ‘AGRICULTURA FAMILIAR’ (Family Farming) and on the right side, in semi-circle, the name of the issuing country ‘POR­TUGAL’ followed by the year of issuance ‘2014’. At the bottom left the mintmark ‘INCM’. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Luxembourg 50th Anniversary of Grand Duke Jean Accession to the Throne Vatican City 25 Years since the Fall of the Berlin Wall • 2 Euro Bimetallic Commemorative Coin “25th Anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall”

Euro coins - Euros

Euro coins - Euros for all European countries  Commemorative – collector euro coins  The introduction of euro coins in January 2002 has generated a variety of coin designs. The euro area countries have put euro coins in circulation with distinctive national symbols on their obverse side. The diversity of the coins' national sides is enhanced with the issuance of commemorative and collector coins by euro area countries.  Numismatic Programme 2016  Commemorative euro coins  Collector coins – Special series Medals List of Greek commemorative and collector euro coins Commemorative euro coins  Commemorative coins are another coin category officially issued by euro area countries.  Each Member State whose currency is the euro may only issue two commemorative coins per year. Exceptionally, they are allowed to issue a third, provided that it is one issued jointly by all euro countries and that it commemorates events of Europe-wide importance. All commemorative euro coins are intended for circulation.  Commemorative coins, which can only be  2 euro denomination coins, are legal tender throughout the euro area. This means that they can be used – and must be accepted – just like any other euro coin.  These coins have the same features and properties and the same common side as normal  2  euro coins. What makes them different is their commemorative design on the national side which commemorates a historical event or a person. Commemorative coins jointly issued by all euro countries use a common design on the national side, showing the name of the issuing country as well as the event commemorated in the respective language(s).  The very first commemorative euro coin was issued in 2004 by Greece on the occasion of the Athens Olympic Games.  Four commemorative coins have been issued jointly by all euro countries:  in March 2007, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, the design was selected following a competition organized by national mints in January 2009, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Economic and Monetary Union, the winning design, selected by the public via an online vote, was created by Mr. Georgios Stamatopoulos, professional designer at the Bank of Greece  in January 2012, to commemorate ten years of euro banknotes and coins, the winning design, selected by the public via an online vote, was created by Mr. Helmut Andexlinger, professional designer at the Austrian Mint and  in July 2015, to celebrate thirty years of the EU flag, the winning design, selected by the public via an online vote, was created by Mr. Georgios Stamatopoulos, professional designer at the Bank of Greece.  Collector euro coins  Collector euro coins are officially issued by euro area countries, have a nominal value (face value) and are legal tender, but are not intended for circulation. The face value and the designs of collector coins are always different than those of euro circulation coins.  While euro circulation coins are legal tender throughout the euro area, euro collector coins are legal tender only in their country of issuance. They are rarely used for payment purposes, because their market value is usually much higher than their nominal value and many of them are made out of precious metals such as gold or silver.  To avoid causing confusion to the public, the technical specifications of collector coins are different from those of circulation coins. At least two out of the three technical parameters, namely colour, diameter and weight, need to be different from those of euro circulation coins.  common side


All coins have a common reverse side showing how much the coin is worth, with a design by Belgian designer Luc Luycx. The design of the 1-, 2-, and 5-cent coins symbolises Western Europe's place in the world as a whole.

The coins were minted in several of the participating countries, many using blanks produced at Birmingham Mint, Birmingham, England.

Current design

In 2007, a new design was introduced to reflect the enlargement in 2004. The design still retains all elements of the original designs, including the twelve stars, however the map of the fifteen states is replaced by one showing the whole of Europe 'as a continent' without borders. The vertical ridges only appear over the 'sea'.

Cyprus is shown several kilometres north west of its real position in order to include it on the map. The original proposal from the European Commission was to include Turkey on the map, however this design was rejected by Council. This was seen as a political snub by the Council to Turkey's EU membership ambitions.

The first issue of these coins were minted in 2006, by the Mint of Finland ltd, for the Slovenian euro coins. These coins came into circulation in 2007 and will be compulsory for existing members to issue from 2008 onwards. The one, two and five cent coins remained unchanged with the Commission stating that they remained unaffected as they show Europe's place in the world, even though the EU 15 are still highlighted on the map.

The original designs of the 10-, 20-, and 50-cent coins showed the outline of each of the EU-15 member states. This meant that each state was shown as separate from the others, though, thus giving Europe an appearance of being formed of many islands. EU members which were not part of the eurozone (the United Kingdom, Sweden and Denmark) were also depicted.

On the €1 and €2 coins, the landmass appeared more cohesive although borders were indicated. The vertical ridges also passed through some non-participating countries. As in current issues, all coins featured 12 stars in their design. Pre-2007 issues are legal tender throughout the eurozone, including new member Slovenia.

The year featured in the coins can date back to 1999, when the currency was formally established (only on French, Spanish, Belgian, Finnish and Dutch coins print 1999). These countries traditionally put on the coin the year when it was minted rather than the year in which it was put into circulation.


National sides

The obverse side varies from state to state, with each member allowed to choose their own design. Each of the eight coins can have the same design (such as Belgian coins), or can vary from each coin (such as Italian coins). In Monarchies, the national side usually features a portrait of the country's monarch, often in a design carried over from the former currency (such as Belgian coins). Republics tend to feature national monuments, symbols or stylised designs (such as French coins). Engravings on the edge of the two euro coin is also subject to national choice.

There are however some restrictions on the design, it must include twelve stars, the engravers initials and the year of issue. New issues must also include the name of the issuing country. It can't repeat the denomination of the coin or the word euro unless it is in a different alphabet (such as on Greek coins). The national side is also restricted from changing until the end of 2008, unless a monarch depicted on a coin dies or abdicates (such as in the case of the Vatican's coins). Following 2004, states could also produce one €2 commemorative coin a year in limited numbers.

There are at present no plans to abolish the national designs in favour of a European one. However the Commission has proposed that the one, two and five cent coins have a common design to keep down costs. Also, in 2007, all eurozone countries issued a near-identical commemorative coin to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the signature of the Treaties of Rome. These coins had the same design except for the name of the country and the language of the text used.

Though they are not members of the EU, Monaco, San Marino and Vatican City also have euro coins featuring a national side, but these only occasionally end up in general circulation as their scarcity leads to greater interest from coin collectors. Andorra is currently in talks to mint its own coin design.

Small-denomination coins

The one and two cent coins were initially introduced in order to ensure that the introduction of the euro was not used as an excuse by retailers to heavily round up prices. However, due to the cost of maintaining a circulation of low value coins, by business and the mints, Finland and the Netherlands have rounded up prices to the nearest five cents (Swedish rounding) while producing only a handful of those coins for collectors, rather than general circulation.

Despite this, the coins are still legal tender and produced outside these states, so if a customer with one cent coin minted elsewhere wishes to pay with it, they may. However, as the amount of non-national coinage in an EU member state is generally much lower than the amount of nationally-minted coinage, the number of 1- and 2-cent coins in circulation will be marginal and thus of little consequence to retailers.

The Finnish law, to round to five cents and not provide change in anything less, was issued in January 2002 before the coins were put into circulation. The Netherlands followed suit in September 2004 with Belgium making moves to in 2005. The Netherlands did so under pressure from retail businesses, who have claimed that dealing with 1- and 2-cent coins is too expensive. After a successful experiment in the city of Woerden in May 2004, retailers in the whole of the Netherlands have been permitted to round cash transactions to the nearest five cent amount since September 2004.

This is in part due to factors such as rising metal prices: The De Nederlandsche Bank calculated it would save $36 million a year by not using the smaller coins. Other countries such as Germany favoured retaining the coins due to their desired for 1.99 euro prices, which appears more attractive to the consumer than a 2 euro price. This is echoed by the European Central Bank itself which support the coins stating it allows businesses to calculate prices more exactly to attract consumers, such as 99 cents. According to a Eurobarometer survey of EU citizens, Germans are most sceptical about the removal of the one and two cents coins from complete circulation in the eurozone, however on average there is a majority for their removal (58% for the one cent coin and 52% for the two cent - in 2005). The Belgians are most supportive of their removal.

The 1, 2 and 5 cent coins account for approximately 80% of all new coins minted in the Eurozone. Due to the expense of producing such low value coinage, the Commission with some member states have proposed that costs could be cut by having a common design on both sides of these coins, rather than minting numerous different designs.
Features for persons with impaired sight

Euro coins were designed in cooperation with organisations representing blind persons, and as a result they incorporate many features allowing them to be distinguished by touch alone. In addition, their visual appearance is designed to make them easy to tell apart for persons who cannot read the actual inscriptions on the coins.

The coins increase in size and weight with value. Of the eight denominations of euro coins, the three lowest denominations are small and distinctly reddish in colour, and quite thin and light. The next three denominations are yellow in colour and thicker, as well as heavier. The highest two denominations are each of two different colours, and are generally larger and thicker than the lower denominations.

In general, the greater the value, the heavier the coin; and the greater the value, the larger the coin. Reddish colour identifies low values; yellow colour identifies medium values; two different colours identify high values.

* The one-cent coin is the smallest of all coins, and size is probably the best way to identify the coin. Its diameter is about the size of the thumb-nail of an average adult. The edge of the coin is smooth, and the coin is copper in colour.

* The two-cent coin is slightly larger than the one-cent coin and is of the same copper colour. It incorporates a distinctive groove running circumferentially around the edge of the coin; this groove can be felt easily by running the finger tip or a fingernail across the edge of the coin; the groove gives the visual and tactile impression that it consists of two coins pressed into one, though this is not the case.

* The five-cent coin is also copper in colour, and is the largest of the copper coins, but only slightly larger than the two-cent coin. It has a smooth edge.

* The ten-cent coin is gold in colour. It is very slightly smaller than a five-cent piece, but it is much thicker, and it has a coarse serration around the edge. It is heavier than any of the copper coins.

* The twenty-cent coin is larger than the ten-cent coin and is also gold in colour. It has a unique group of seven notches (forming a spanish flower shape) around its otherwise-smooth edge, making it easy to recognise by touch.

* The fifty-cent coin is also gold in colour and is noticeably thicker, heavier, and larger than the coins of smaller denominations, and it also has a coarsely serrated edge.

* The one-euro coin has a silver interior and a gold perimeter. The edge is distinctively marked with alternating smooth and finely serrated sections. It is of about the same thickness and weight as the fifty-cent piece, but its edge markings readily distinguish it from that coin.

* The two-euro coin is of the same colours as the one-euro coin, but they are reversed: the perimeter is silver, and the interior is gold. It has the largest diameter of any euro coin. Its edge has a fine, continuous serration. The edge is also embossed with stars and letters differing between nations, but this is difficult to detect by touch, and may not be necessary in order to distinguish it from other coins, given its size.

Although there have been other currencies predating the euro that were specifically designed in similar ways (different sizes, colours, and ridges) to aid the visually impaired, the introduction of the euro constitutes the first time that authorities have consulted associations representing the blind before, rather than after, the release of the currency.

Commemorative issues

Each state allowed to issue coins may also mint one commemorative coin each year. Only two euro coins maybe used in this way (for them to be legal tender) and there is a limit on the amount that can be issued. However the coin must show the normal design criteria, such as the twelve stars, the year and the issuing country.

Greece was the first country to issue a commemorative coin, and was followed by all but France, the Netherlands, Ireland and Slovenia. However in 2007 every eurozone state participated in the Treaty of Rome programme, where all member states issued a coin of similar design to commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Rome (difference being the name of the issuing country and the language of the text).

This may be repeated in 2009 in commemoration of the 10th anniversary of the introduction of the euro. Since 2006, Germany has been issuing a series of coins, the German Bundeslander series, showing each of the states of Germany on its coins between 2006 and 2021. Common programmes such as the Treaty of Rome and euro anniversary do not count as a state's yearly issue.
Gold and silver commemorative issues

A legacy of old national practice is the minting of silver and gold commemorative coins. Unlike normal issues, these coins are not legal tender in all the Eurozone, but only in the country where the coin was issued. For instance, a €10 Finnish commemorative coin cannot be used in the Netherlands.

Despite this, these coins are not really intended to be used as means of payment, as their scrap value generally vastly exceeds their face value, so it does not constitute a serious problem. The major exception is Germany, where silver ten euro commemoratives are available at banks and some retailers at face value. The coins, however, generally do not circulate.

It is uncertain whether the Council of Ministers will grant them legal tender status elsewhere outside national boundaries, as San Marino, Monaco and Vatican City also issue these kind of coins.

Euro coins,  euro coin sets  2014. Euro coin issues from 18 Euro zone countries.  Euro coins Vatican, Euro coins Monaco, Euro coins San Marino.  2 Euros,  1 Euro.   Images of Euro Coins - 1 Euro coin -  which country euro coins are from.   Euro coins,   Slovenian euro coin -  These coins came into circulation in 2007.  Cypriot euro coins - Cypriot euro coins feature three separate designs for the three series of coins. Cyprus has been a member of the European Union since 1 May 2004. Eurocoins.  Eurocoins from all countries.  Unc sets, BU  sets and proof sets, starter kits, commemorative silver and gold coins. Κέρματα Ευρώ,  κέρματα Ευρώ από όλες τις χώρες The Euro Coins,  euro area.  The euro coin series comprises eight different denominations. The euro coins - Greek Euro coins - 2 Euros, 1 Euro,  50 euro cents,  20 euro cents,  10 euro cents,   5 euro cents,  2 euro cents and  1 euro cent. The design of the euro coins:  Euro coins have one common side and one national side. They can be used anywhere within the euro area, regardless of the country of issue. France - Euro coins, Official BU Set 2014 Includes coins of 1c-2c-5c-10c-20c-50c-1euro-2euro denominations with 2014 Yeardate. 1 Euro and 50 Cent denominations exclusively available in the BU and Proof Mintsets. Benelux - Official BU Set 2014 This special set contains eight Brilliant Uncirculated (BU) coins issued in 2014 by the three Benelux countries, Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg. Germany - Official BU Set (A,D,F,G,J) 2014 The Official BU Euro coins issued in 2014 by the 5 German mints. Each set contains the 2 Euro commemorative coin 2014, St. Michael, Lower Saxony. Germany - Official Coin set BU 2014 The Official BU Euro coins issued in 2014. It contains also the 2 Euro commemorative coin 2014, St. Michael, Lower Saxony. Ireland - Euro coins, Official BU Set 2014 2014 Annual Mint Set. This 2014 Uncirculated Euro Coin Set pays tribute to Ireland’s proud maritime heritage. Latvia - Euro coins, Official BU Set 2014 The first official Euro coins of Latvia, 1 cent to 2 Euro 2014 in BU quality. Lavia has been the 18th country of Euro zone area since 1st January 2014. Latvia - Euro Coins, Complete UNC set 2014 The first Euro coins of Latvia, 1 cent to 2 Euro 2014 in UNC quality. Lavia has been the 18th country of Euro zone area since 1st January 2014. Luxemburg - Complete UNC Euro set 2014 The eight Luxemburg Euro denominations 2014 in UNC quality, placed in Euro coins folder. Austria - Euro coins, Official BU set 2014 This Brilliant Uncirculated Euro coins set from Austria contains all eight of the 2014-dated Euro coins. Belgium - Official BU Set, king Philip, 2014 The official Belgian Euro coin set BU 2014. Contains the coins from 1 cent to 2 Euro 2014 in BU quality + medal with the image of king Philip and queen Mathilde. The coin set is dedicated to the coronation of king Philip. Portugal - Official BU Set 2014 The official 2014 BU issue from the Portuguese Mint, the Casa de Moeda. Portugal - Official FDC Set 2014 The Official FDC Portuguese 2014 eurocoins set. Portugal - Official BABY Set 2014 The official 2014 BABY set from the Portuguese Mint, the Casa de Moeda. Netherlands - Official coin set BU, Willem Alexander, 2014 Official Euro coins set (Brilliant Uncirculated) of Netherlands, 2014 with the portrait of the new King Willem Alexander. Luxemburg - Official BU Set 2014 The 2014 BU Set contains one coin of each of the 8 denominations and the commemorative 2 Euro coin of 2014, Independence. The 2014 coin set is dedicated to the City of Dudelange. Vatican - Official Euro coin set 2014 The eight Vatican Εuro coins 2014 in Brilliant Uncirculated quality. The first coin set with the portrait of Pope Francis. Vatican - Official Euro coin set Proof 2014 + 20 EURO Ag 2014 Euro Coin Set - PROOF Version 8 coins (1 cent, 2 cent, 5 cent, 10 cent, 20 cent, 50 cent, 1 euro, 2 euro) with Silver coin 20 Euro, dedicated to Pope John XXIII, Ag 925/1000, weight 26g, diameter 36mm. Netherlands - Complete UNC Set, Willem Alexander, 2014 Complete Euro coins set of Netherlands, 2014. Official introduction set with the portrait of the new King Willem Alexander. Finland - Euro coins, Official BU Set 2014 The theme of Mint of Finland’s first coinage of the year is the Isokari lighthouse. The 2014 coinage includes all Finnish metal circulation coins for 2014 and the Isokari mint medal.  2 Euro 2014, Commemorative 2 Euro 2014, Euro coins UNC, new euro coins, Euro coins of all countries, 2 Euro Vatican, 2 Euro San Marino. €2 commemorative coins are special euro coins minted and issued by member states of the eurozone since 2004 as legal tender in all eurozone member states. Only the national obverse sides of the coins differ; the common reverse sides do not. The coins typically commemorate the anniversaries of historical events or draw attention to current events of special importance. Portugal – 2 Euro, the Carnation Revolution, 2014 Portugal, commemorative coin 2 Euro 2014, 40th Anniversary of the Carnation Revolution. Italy – 2 Euro BU, 200 years Carabinieri, 2014 (in blister) Italian 2 Euro coin 2014 to commemorate the 200th Anniversary of the establishment of Italian police, Carabinieri 1814-2014. Quality brilliant Uncirculated in blister. Slovakia – 2 Euro, accession to the EU, 2014 Commemorative coin in nominal value of 2 Euro. Slovakia's accession to the European Union, 10th anniversary. Slovakia – 2 Euro, accession to the EU, 2014 (coin card) Commemorative coin in nominal value of 2 Euro. Slovakia's accession to the European Union, 10th anniversary. Mintage: 7000 pcs, numbered! Spain – 2 Euro, Antoni Gaudí's Park Güell, 2014 The 2 Euro commemorative coin of Spain 2014. UNESCO's World Heritage series celebrating the Work of Antoni Gaudí. Luxemburg - 2 Euro, 175 years of independence, 2014 Commemorative 2 Euro coin 2014, dedicated to the 175 years of independence of Luxemburg. Luxemburg - 2 Euro, Independence, 2014 (coin card) Commemorative 2 Euro coin 2014, dedicated to the 175 years of independence of Luxemburg. Latvia - 2 Euro UNC, Latvian folk maiden, 2014 The first 2 Euro coin of Latvia 2014 in UNC quality. Latvia is he 18th country of Euro zone area since 1st January 2014. The 2 Euro coin features a Latvian folk maiden. Germany – 2 Euro, St. Michael, Lower Saxony, 2014 (A,D,F,G,J) The new commemorative 2 Euro coin of Germany 2014, which belongs to the German Bundeslander series, shows the Church of St. Michael in Hildesheim, Lower Saxony. Germany – 2 Euro, St. Michael, Lower Saxony, 2014 The new commemorative 2 Euro coin of Germany 2014, which belongs to the German Bundeslander series, shows the Church of St. Michael in Hildesheim, Lower Saxony. Luxembourg 175th Anniversary of the Foundation of Luxembourg's Independence The coin depicts on the right hand side of its inner part the effigy of His Royal Highness, the Grand-Duke Henri, looking to the right, and on the left hand side of its inner part, vertically positioned, the years ‘1839’ and ‘2014’ and the name of the issuing country ‘LËTZEBUERG’. The inscriptions ‘ONOFHÄNGEGKEET’ and ‘175 Joër’ appear at the bottom of the inner part of the coin. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Germany St. Michael's Church in Hildesheim, Lower Saxony. Spain Park Güell, Work of Antoni Gaudí. Fifth of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites series The coin depicts in the foreground a lizard sculpture which is the Park Güell emblem and was designed by the architect Antoni Gaudí. As background a detail of one of the pavilions situated at the Park Güell entrance. At the top, in circular sense and in capital letters the words ‘ESPAÑA’ and ‘PARK GÜELL — GAUDÍ’. At the left the year of issuance ‘2014’ and at the right the mintmark. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Slovakia 10 Years of Slovakian Membership in European Union Belgium 100 Years since the Beginning of World War I Portugal 40 Years since the Carnation Revolution The two curves represent the general shape of a carnation, the flower symbolizing the movement, which was also the origin of the revolution’s name. The name of the issuing country ‘PORTUGAL’ and the Coat of Arms are inscribed on the top of the flower. The center of the image shows the date of the event ‘25 DE ABRIL’ (25th April) and at the bottom is written the number of years past since the revolution ‘40 ANOS’(40 years) and the year of issuance ‘2014’. The shape of the letters and numbers is inspired on those used in posters and other political information supports 40 years ago, as a symbol of the euphoric period lived right after the event. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Netherlands King Willem-Alexander and Princess Beatrix San Marino 500th Anniversary since the Death of Donato Bramante Malta Independence from Britain in 1964 France 70 Years since D-Day Finland 100 Years since the Birth of Tove Jansson Malta 200th Anniversary of the Malta Police Force Finland 150th Anniversary of Finish Coining San Marino 90th Anniversary since the Death of Giacomo Puccini Belgium 150 Years Belgium Red Cross Latvia Riga, cultural Capital of Europe The central image of the coin shows the skyline of Riga and the historic centre of the city that has been included in the list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites. At the top of the image, the inscription ‘EIROPAS KULTURAS GALVASPILSETA’ (European capital of culture) and at the bottom the name of the celebrated city and the year of issuance ‘RIGA — 2014’, and underneath the indication of the issuing country ‘LV’. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Italy 450th Years since the Birth of Galileo Galilei Greece 400 Years since the Death of El Greco Greece 150th Anniversary of the Union of the Ionian Islands with Greece Slovenia 600th Anniversary since the Coronation of Barbara of Celje The central image of the coin shows, with lined pattern, the portrait of the Queen Barbara of Celje with her sceptre. On the image are placed three typical six-pointed stars of Celje counts. On the left side of the portrait is the inscription ‘SLOVENIJA’ and on the right side the inscription ‘BARBARA CELJSKA’ and the years ‘1414-2014’. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. France World AIDS Day Portugal International Year of Family Farming Description: On the central part of the design are represented tools typically used in the traditional agriculture, together with farming products: a chicken in the center, surrounded by pumpkins, a basket of potatoes, and other vegetables and flowers. On the left side, in semi-circle, the subject of the commemoration ‘AGRICULTURA FAMILIAR’ (Family Farming) and on the right side, in semi-circle, the name of the issuing country ‘POR­TUGAL’ followed by the year of issuance ‘2014’. At the bottom left the mintmark ‘INCM’. The coin’s outer ring depicts the 12 stars of the European flag. Luxembourg 50th Anniversary of Grand Duke Jean Accession to the Throne Vatican City 25 Years since the Fall of the Berlin Wall • 2 Euro Bimetallic Commemorative Coin “25th Anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall”

EURO COINS

Lithuania - 2 Euro, Baltic Culture, 2016

Lithuania 2 Euro commemorative coins - Baltic Culture, 2016.

Price: 3,50 €
Lithuania - 2 Euro, Lithuanian Language, 2015

Lithuania 2 Euro commemorative coins 2015 - Lithuanian Language.

Price: 3,50 €