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SOVEREIGNS

Celebrate 200 years of the modern Sovereign  A coin unrivalled in quality, accuracy and design  In 1817, The Sovereign was reborn as the embodiment of the Gold Standard. It has remained a constant through two centuries of economic and social change, still relevant as a globally traded bullion coin and sought-after as a commemorative coin.  This special release returns to Benedetto Pistrucci’s original ‘garter’ masterpiece, struck for the first time since 1820. The familiar St George and the dragon design is surrounded by the full Latin inscription and garter border first struck on the Sovereigns of 1817. For this 2017 edition of the 22 carat gold Proof coin, the date appears on the obverse for the first time since 1887.   A three-coin set to celebrate the modern Sovereign  A coin still respected, reliable and revered today   When Pistrucci created the design for the Sovereigns of 1817, he couldn’t have known that the gold coin would still be every bit as relevant two centuries later. Today, The Sovereign is synonymous with Pistrucci’s masterpiece design, recognised around the world as a symbol of unequalled accuracy and quality.   All three coins in this limited edition set feature a return to Benedetto Pistrucci’s original design – with full garter border and inscription – which featured on the first Sovereigns of 1817. The date appears on the obverse of this 2017 edition, for the first time since 1887.  This set includes The Sovereign, The Half-Sovereign and The Quarter-Sovereign, all struck in 22 carat gold and finished to Proof standard. The coins are presented together in a wooden case with a booklet that reveals the story of the modern Sovereign and an excerpt from Dr Kevin Clancy’s book A History of The Sovereign: Chief Coin of the World, a Royal Mint Museum Publication.  Gold sovereigns Queen Victoria’s reign. Three famous portraits on three original Sovereigns from Queen Victoria’s reign. A Remarkable Reign. Queen Victoria inherited the throne at the young age of 18. She would go on to reign for more than six decades; a reign so remarkable and long that it was only surpassed by her great-great-granddaughter, Her Majesty The Queen, in 2015. She was a queen with an interest in her people, her armed forces and in politics, beginning traditions that are still observed today. Victoria was the head of a large family, who took steps to become more accessible to the British people. She was a loving wife whose deep mourning for her husband has characterised the way in which she is remembered. The Victorian era saw a great expansion of Empire, and with it a growth in Britain’s industry, trade and population; all resulting in the need for vast quantities of coins. Due to the length of her reign, the coinage issued in Victoria’s name was one of the most prolific in British history, rivalled only by that of Queen Elizabeth II. Victoria’s coins were used by a quarter of the world’s population. The gold Sovereign played a vital role in the Victorian era. The coin was struck with great accuracy and carried the likeness of Queen Victoria on its obverse. From 1871 the portrait of the queen was paired with the famous St George and the dragon on The Sovereign’s reverse, making it instantly recognisable anywhere in the world. Throughout Victoria’s long reign, there were a number of royal portraits, but broadly three main effigies were used on her coinage. Her reign began with a portrait by William Wyon RA, one of The Royal Mint’s most famous engravers. His classically-styled ‘Young Head’ appeared on Victoria’s coins until she was in her late 60s. The ‘Jubilee Head’ was introduced in 1887, with Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm depicting the queen with a small crown. Queen Victoria’s last coinage portrait, known as the ‘Old Head’, by Thomas Brock RA, was introduced in 1893 and would remain until her death in 1901. This collection from The Royal Mint Originals range brings together three Victorian Sovereigns, originally struck by The Royal Mint – the home of Queen Victoria’s coins – more than a century ago. The 22 carat gold coins have been presented in this set that celebrates one of the United Kingdom’s most influential monarchs. The three famous coinage portraits from Victoria’s reign feature on the obverses of the coins. Each one is paired with the classic St George and the dragon design by Benedetto Pistrucci, which graced the reverse of Victorian Sovereigns minted after 1871. The Design Queen Victoria’s Portraits  The ‘Young Head’ portrait was created by William Wyon RA, an esteemed engraver who was said to have enjoyed a pleasant relationship with Queen Victoria. She is reported to have told Wyon, “You always represent me favourably” while he found the queen an excellent sitter. Struck between 1838 and 1887, the young portrait was flattering and inspired by the neo-classical. In 1887, the year of Queen Victoria’s golden jubilee, Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm created a new portrait to mark the event. A fashionable and busy sculptor, Boehm developed the Jubilee portrait over a period of some eight years. The celebratory effigy depicted the queen with a small crown and reflected her maturity. It was struck between 1887 and 1893, and became known as the ‘Jubilee Head’. Queen Victoria’s last coinage portrait was introduced in 1893 and would remain until her death in 1901. The design, by Sir Thomas Brock RA, was known as the ‘Old Head’ or ‘Veiled Head’ and depicted Victoria as she is often remembered – in her crown and veil. St George and the Dragon  All three Sovereigns feature the famous St George and the dragon design by Benedetto Pistrucci. The renowned Italian engraver was commissioned by The Royal Mint to work on new designs for the recoinage of 1816. His depiction of St George slaying the dragon was inspired by the Greek style. New editions of The Sovereign featuring Pistrucci’s iconic design first appeared in 1817 and his stirring depiction is still struck on the 22 carat gold coin today.

SOVEREIGNS

Celebrate 200 years of the modern Sovereign  A coin unrivalled in quality, accuracy and design  In 1817, The Sovereign was reborn as the embodiment of the Gold Standard. It has remained a constant through two centuries of economic and social change, still relevant as a globally traded bullion coin and sought-after as a commemorative coin.  This special release returns to Benedetto Pistrucci’s original ‘garter’ masterpiece, struck for the first time since 1820. The familiar St George and the dragon design is surrounded by the full Latin inscription and garter border first struck on the Sovereigns of 1817. For this 2017 edition of the 22 carat gold Proof coin, the date appears on the obverse for the first time since 1887.   A three-coin set to celebrate the modern Sovereign  A coin still respected, reliable and revered today   When Pistrucci created the design for the Sovereigns of 1817, he couldn’t have known that the gold coin would still be every bit as relevant two centuries later. Today, The Sovereign is synonymous with Pistrucci’s masterpiece design, recognised around the world as a symbol of unequalled accuracy and quality.   All three coins in this limited edition set feature a return to Benedetto Pistrucci’s original design – with full garter border and inscription – which featured on the first Sovereigns of 1817. The date appears on the obverse of this 2017 edition, for the first time since 1887.  This set includes The Sovereign, The Half-Sovereign and The Quarter-Sovereign, all struck in 22 carat gold and finished to Proof standard. The coins are presented together in a wooden case with a booklet that reveals the story of the modern Sovereign and an excerpt from Dr Kevin Clancy’s book A History of The Sovereign: Chief Coin of the World, a Royal Mint Museum Publication.  Gold sovereigns Queen Victoria’s reign. Three famous portraits on three original Sovereigns from Queen Victoria’s reign. A Remarkable Reign. Queen Victoria inherited the throne at the young age of 18. She would go on to reign for more than six decades; a reign so remarkable and long that it was only surpassed by her great-great-granddaughter, Her Majesty The Queen, in 2015. She was a queen with an interest in her people, her armed forces and in politics, beginning traditions that are still observed today. Victoria was the head of a large family, who took steps to become more accessible to the British people. She was a loving wife whose deep mourning for her husband has characterised the way in which she is remembered. The Victorian era saw a great expansion of Empire, and with it a growth in Britain’s industry, trade and population; all resulting in the need for vast quantities of coins. Due to the length of her reign, the coinage issued in Victoria’s name was one of the most prolific in British history, rivalled only by that of Queen Elizabeth II. Victoria’s coins were used by a quarter of the world’s population. The gold Sovereign played a vital role in the Victorian era. The coin was struck with great accuracy and carried the likeness of Queen Victoria on its obverse. From 1871 the portrait of the queen was paired with the famous St George and the dragon on The Sovereign’s reverse, making it instantly recognisable anywhere in the world. Throughout Victoria’s long reign, there were a number of royal portraits, but broadly three main effigies were used on her coinage. Her reign began with a portrait by William Wyon RA, one of The Royal Mint’s most famous engravers. His classically-styled ‘Young Head’ appeared on Victoria’s coins until she was in her late 60s. The ‘Jubilee Head’ was introduced in 1887, with Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm depicting the queen with a small crown. Queen Victoria’s last coinage portrait, known as the ‘Old Head’, by Thomas Brock RA, was introduced in 1893 and would remain until her death in 1901. This collection from The Royal Mint Originals range brings together three Victorian Sovereigns, originally struck by The Royal Mint – the home of Queen Victoria’s coins – more than a century ago. The 22 carat gold coins have been presented in this set that celebrates one of the United Kingdom’s most influential monarchs. The three famous coinage portraits from Victoria’s reign feature on the obverses of the coins. Each one is paired with the classic St George and the dragon design by Benedetto Pistrucci, which graced the reverse of Victorian Sovereigns minted after 1871. The Design Queen Victoria’s Portraits  The ‘Young Head’ portrait was created by William Wyon RA, an esteemed engraver who was said to have enjoyed a pleasant relationship with Queen Victoria. She is reported to have told Wyon, “You always represent me favourably” while he found the queen an excellent sitter. Struck between 1838 and 1887, the young portrait was flattering and inspired by the neo-classical. In 1887, the year of Queen Victoria’s golden jubilee, Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm created a new portrait to mark the event. A fashionable and busy sculptor, Boehm developed the Jubilee portrait over a period of some eight years. The celebratory effigy depicted the queen with a small crown and reflected her maturity. It was struck between 1887 and 1893, and became known as the ‘Jubilee Head’. Queen Victoria’s last coinage portrait was introduced in 1893 and would remain until her death in 1901. The design, by Sir Thomas Brock RA, was known as the ‘Old Head’ or ‘Veiled Head’ and depicted Victoria as she is often remembered – in her crown and veil. St George and the Dragon  All three Sovereigns feature the famous St George and the dragon design by Benedetto Pistrucci. The renowned Italian engraver was commissioned by The Royal Mint to work on new designs for the recoinage of 1816. His depiction of St George slaying the dragon was inspired by the Greek style. New editions of The Sovereign featuring Pistrucci’s iconic design first appeared in 1817 and his stirring depiction is still struck on the 22 carat gold coin today.

WORLD COINS

Great Britain - Elizabeth II, Gold Sovereign BU, 2017

The 2017 Gold Bullion Sovereign. A genuine gold sovereign from the British Royal Mint, struck in 22 carat gold to Brilliant Uncirculated quality.

Price: 315,00 €
Great Britain - Elizabeth II, Gold Sovereign PROOF, 2017

The 2017 Gold Sovereign PROOF. A genuine gold sovereign from the British Royal Mint, struck in 22 carat gold to PROOF quality.

Price: 995,00 €
Great Britain - 10 X Elizabeth II, Gold Sovereign, 2012

The 2012 Gold Bullion Sovereign. A genuine gold sovereign from the British Royal Mint, struck in 22 carat gold to Brilliant Uncirculated quality. New St George and dragon design only for 2012.

Price: 3.150,00 €
Great Britain - 10 X Elizabeth II, Gold Sovereign BU, 2013

The 2013 Gold Bullion Sovereign. A genuine gold sovereign from the British Royal Mint, struck in 22 carat gold to Brilliant Uncirculated quality.

Price: 3.100,00 €
Great Britain - Elizabeth II, Gold Sovereign BU, 2016

The 2016 Gold Bullion Sovereign. A genuine gold sovereign from the British Royal Mint, struck in 22 carat gold to Brilliant Uncirculated quality.

Price: 315,00 €
Great Britain - 10 X Elizabeth II, Gold Sovereign BU, 2014

The 2014 Gold Bullion Sovereign. A genuine gold sovereign from the British Royal Mint, struck in 22 carat gold to Brilliant Uncirculated quality.

Price: 3.100,00 €
Great Britain - Elizabeth II, Gold Sovereign UNC, 1966

The Gold Bullion Sovereign. A genuine gold sovereign from the British Royal Mint, struck in 22 carat gold. Diameter 22.05 mm. Weight 7.98g

Price: 345,00 €
Great Britain - Elizabeth II, Gold Sovereign UNC, 1968

The Gold Bullion Sovereign. A genuine gold sovereign from the British Royal Mint, struck in 22 carat gold. Diameter 22.05 mm. Weight 7.98g

Price: 345,00 €
Great Britain - Victoria, Gold Sovereign XF, 1888 - London

British Gold Sovereign. Victoria Jubilee Head on Obverse and St. George & Dragon on Reverse. Diameter 22.05 mm. Weight 7.98g

Price: 365,00 €
Great Britain - Victoria, Gold Sovereign XF, 1889 - M

British Gold Sovereign. Victoria Jubilee Head on Obverse and St. George & Dragon on Reverse. Diameter 22.05 mm. Weight 7.98g

Price: 365,00 €
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