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British Coins

BRITISH COINS, British Annual sets, British Annual coin sets, British Gold coins, British Gold Sovereign, British Silver coins.. The coinage of the United Kingdom is changing. Familiar designs that have served us well for almost 40 years will be replaced by a new set of designs, contemporary in treatment yet grounded in the traditions of the coinage. Now, in a new age, the time has come to rejuvenate the coinage by seeking designs that treat traditional symbols in an innovative and modern way. The series that has been chosen brings new life to the coinage and, like the decimal designs 40 years ago, draws inspiration from the very fabric of British history. The Royal Shield of Arms - The New Designs Revealed The Royal Mint is delighted to reveal to you the new designs that will appear on our coins. Individually, the coins focus on details of the shield of the Royal arms and when placed together they reveal the complete shield. View the new coin designs now Celebrate the Unveiling and Mark the End of an Era This is undoubtedly one of the most significant coin design changes in British history, and to mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering an exciting range of limited-edition collections, giving collectors the opportunity to own a piece of numismatic history. As a powerful symbol of royal authority the Royal Arms, in its various forms, has featured on the coinage of almost every monarch since the reign of Edward III (1327-77). Coins were, and still are, issued under the personal authority of the monarch and came to be regarded as vehicles for royal imagery, whether in the form of a portrait or a monarch's personal Coat of Arms. Virtually unchanged since the reign of Queen Victoria, the Royal Arms is a symbol of the Queen's authority over the whole of the United Kingdom, and has been used to powerful effect by numismatic artists over the course of her reign. The modern £1 coin of 1983 appropriately bore the Royal Arms on its reverse, the detailed depiction by Eric Sewell now a famous symbol of British currency. This was followed in 1988 with a £1 reverse design by Derek Gorringe depicting a crowned shield of the Royal Arms, reminiscent of the early sovereigns of Queen Victoria. It is not surprising then that Matthew Dent chose the Royal Arms, and in particular the shield of the Royal Arms, as the theme for his innovative range of new designs. The Royal Arms is divided into four parts: England being represented by the three lions passant guardant in the first and fourth quarters, the Scottish lion rampant in the second and the harp of Ireland in the third, with all four quarters spread over the six coins from the 1p to the 50p. Completing the new range of coins is the £1 coin featuring the shield of the Royal Arms in its entirety, uniting the six fragmented elements into one design. The New Designs Revealed The new designs have been chosen via an open competition which was widely publicized in the national media in August 2005 and attracted 4,000 entries. The winning designer is 26-year-old Matthew Dent, originally from Bangor who now lives and works in London as a graphic designer. After exploring a number of different options, Matthew Dent finally developed the heraldic theme, taking the greatest heraldic device ever used on coinage - the Royal Arms. As you can see in the image to the right, the Shield of the Royal Arms has been given a contemporary treatment and its whole has been cleverly split among all six denominations from the 1p to the 50p, with the £1 coin displaying the heraldic element in its entirety. This is the first time that a single design has been used across a range of United Kingdom coins. The new designs will enter circulation gradually throughout the year. It is normal practice for banks to order coins from the Royal Mint to satisfy public demand, which fluctuates over the course of the year. The current coin designs will remain in circulation and as legal tender for the foreseeable future. To mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering a range of magnificent limited-edition collections produced to Proof quality. The process of choosing the new designs to replace the familiar heraldic emblems on Britain's circulating coins began with a public competition. The competition generated more than 4,000 designs from over 500 people - the largest response to any public competition organized to change the British coinage. Specially invited artists, Royal Mint engravers and artists from other European countries vied with people of all ages and sections of society. The brief allowed those taking part a free hand to prepare a coherent series of designs' and while they were encouraged to explore heraldic emblems and motifs, the door was left open for other ways in which to symbolize Britain. Proof coins are produced to the highest quality. The modern minting process incorporates state-of-the-art technology as well as centuries-old hand skills of Royal Mint craftsmen, which are particularly important in the manufacture of the dies. Master tools are created with great care, minute details of the artist's design being perfected by experienced engravers. To achieve the superior quality of Proof coins, the die is sand blasted with fine particles to give a frosted finish. The surrounding table or field is then carefully hand-polished with diamond paste, a process that takes many hours and considerable skill, resulting in the mirror-like finish. Blanks for Proof coins must be completely free from any blemishes and are polished to a brilliant shine before each one is struck individually at least three times under tremendous pressure between the carefully prepared dies. Finally, each coin is meticulously inspected to ensure that only perfect specimens are placed into protective capsules and sent to collectors. The Royal Mint has issued a superb Brilliant Uncirculated Collection of 11 UK legal tender coins. At the heart of the collection are the new definitive coins by Matthew Dent, which form the shield of the Royal Arms. Bruce Rushin's familiar £2 technology coin, two commemorative £2 coins, one celebrating the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the other marking the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns, are also included together with the 50p piece commemorating the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The coins are beautifully displayed in an informative and fully illustrated presentation folder detailing the history behind the coin designs. Set contains all UK definitive coins for 2009, including Bruce Rushin's £2 technology coin and three new commemorative coins Beautifully displayed in a colourful presentation folder which provides history behind the heraldry of UK coins The first time that the new definitive coins have appeared in a set with the commemorative issues. The perfect gift for anyone celebrating a special occasion in 2009, whether a birth, christening or anniversary, this unique coin collection will make a happy memento.

BRITISH GOLD COINS. The modern sovereign made its appearance in 1817 and came to be known as ‘the chief coin of the world’. Now, in 2009, the sovereign has again been struck in 22 carat gold using original nineteenth-century tools and featuring the classic portrayal of St George and the dragon. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time The sovereign unusually features Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the helmet minus its streamer Low issue limit of just 12,500 Presented in a walnut-veneer case with a numbered Certificate of Authenticity. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available struck to the highest Proof quality and presented in a case accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity attesting to the low issue of 12,500. The 2009 UK Gold Proof Sovereign is the ideal gift on the occasion of a special anniversary, important birthday or celebrating a graduation in 2009 For centuries gold has been praised for its beauty and value. Now the Royal Mint brings you an affordable way to appreciate its precious qualities with an opportunity to purchase the 2009 Gold Bullion Sovereign. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time in the modern production process The sovereign features Benedetto Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the same individual characteristics as the coins of the 1820s Struck in 22 carat gold to uncirculated quality Worldwide issue limit of 75,000 Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available within a specially designed outer sleeve to reflect the famous coin design of St George and the dragon. From the arrival of a baby, to a wedding, to retirement or special anniversary, a 2009 bullion sovereign from the Royal Mint makes an ideal and timeless gift of gold. Following its introduction in 2008, the new definitive £1 is now available individually. Struck to gold Proof quality, the coin is displayed in a walnut-veneer case. The coin has been struck in 22 carat gold to Proof quality, the Royal Mint's highest standard The coin is new for 2009 Only 1,000 gold Proof coins will be available worldwide Receive a Designing Change book, personally signed by the editor Dr Kevin Clancy, absolutely FREE when you purchase the £1 gold Proof Coin The reverse features the shield of the Royal Arms As a legal tender coin of the UK, the obverse features the current portrait of Her Majesty The Queen by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS Beautifully presented in a walnut-veneer presentation case and accompanied by an individually numbered Certificate of Authenticity. This beautiful gold coin will make the perfect gift for the extra special person in your life. It is also suitable for collectors who are interested in British coinage and its history. To celebrate the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns the Royal Mint is issuing a series of UK commemorative £2 coins. One of Scotland’s favourite sons, Robert Burns was a passionate poet and lyricist as well as a witty satirist of his religious and political peers. His most famous work is perhaps Auld Lang Syne, a song celebrating friendship and sung every year on New Year’s Eve in the English-speaking world. The coin has been struck to Proof quality - the Royal Mint’s highest standard The commemorative reverse features an extract from Auld Lang Syne, in Burns’ own handwriting As a legal tender coin of the UK, the obverse features the current portrait of Her Majesty The Queen by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS Ideal to present as a gift. Anyone with an interest in the famous poet Robert Burns would be delighted to receive this coin to celebrate the 250th anniversary of his birth. It makes an ideal retirement or birthday gift as well as an anniversary gift. Struck in 22 carat gold, this beautiful half-sovereign embodies almost two centuries of numismatic tradition, making this limited-edition coin highly sought after. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time in the modern production process The half-sovereign features Benedetto Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the same characteristics as the coins of 1893 Struck in 22 carat gold to uncirculated quality Worldwide issue limit of 50,000 Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available within a specially designed outer sleeve to reflect the famous coin design of St George and the dragon. The 2009 bullion half-sovereign is the ideal gift on the occasion of a special anniversary, important birthday or celebrating a graduation in 2009. Sovereigns As Gold Bullion Ancient History When the world's first coins were produced in the seventh century B.C., they were simply a measured and guaranteed amount of precious metal, gold or silver, of a known purity. Almost three thousand years later, at the beginning of the twentieth century, the currency value of most coins was close to that of their intrinsic precious metal content , their bullion value. Gold has almost always been the preferred security for most currencies. Governments and central banks store much of their gold bullion in the form of 400 ounce bullion bars, but also maintain stocks of gold in the form of gold coins. The 20th Century For Great Britain, the obvious choice of bullion coin is the gold sovereign, and many other central and commercial banks keep a proportion of their gold bullion in the form of British gold sovereigns. The start of the first world war caused a major change in coins and currency the entire world over. Countries moved their currencies off the "gold standard". Within a decade, most countries converted to using paper money, and a token coinage, token meaning that the underlying bullion value would be much less than their face value. The Second Millennium It is only natural that at times of uncertainty, people everywhere seek to protect their assets from potential disasters. Whether it be fears of the millennium bug, worries about the "Euro", the end of the pound sterling, the collapse of the rouble, there are sound arguments for retaining at least a small proportion of surplus wealth in an ultra secure investment form. Gold has performed this traditional role since before the first coins came into existence. As one of the worlds oldest, most historic, and most recognisable gold coins, the gold sovereign makes an ideal bullion coin. Sovereigns weigh 7.98 grams and are made of 22 carat gold (carat means 1/24) or 91.66% pure, and therefore contains 7.315 grams or 0.2353544 troy ounces of pure gold. 2009 Gold Sovereigns The 2009 sovereigns are expected to have the familiar St. George and Dragon design. St. George and Dragon - Recut 2009 Reverse Dies The traditional St George & Dragon design has been used on sovereigns, with a few breaks, since 1817. During this long period, there have been a considerable number of minor changes to the dies used for the reverse (tail side). In 2007, the reverse design appears to have been completely re-engraved, although there was no advance announcement of this from the Royal Mint. The 2009 reverse dies have again been re-engraved, using "original Victorian tools". For details use the link from the heading of this paragraph. British Gold Sovereigns In 1816 the gold British Sovereign was first introduced, and as the British Empire expanded under Queen Victoria during the 1800’s, this coin came to be the world’s most widely distributed gold coin. Minted originally in London, the Sovereign came to be minted all over the world as Australia and South Africa came to be large gold producers. Mints in Pretoria, Bombay, Ottawa, Melbourne, Perth, and Sydney turned out hundreds of millions of Sovereigns during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Because of the huge output of gold Sovereigns at that time, and the fact that they have been traded and hoarded all over the world ever since, these roughly nickel-sized gold coins are available today at bullion prices. Although these coins are sometimes promoted as ‘scarce" and marked up outrageously by numismatic sales companies, in fact, they are currently available at bullion prices. These handsome coins portray the reigning monarch on one side, and Pestrucci's St. George and the Dragon on the other side. Gold Sovereigns were struck in the traditional 22karat (.917 fine gold) as were most gold coins made for circulation. The coins weigh 8 grams and contain just under a quarter-ounce of gold (.2354 troy ounce) As an international gold coin, the gold Sovereign has no equal. Whether in Cairo, Hong Kong, Beijing, Moscow, or nearly any spot on the globe, this coin commands instant recognition. Gold Coin Sets The First Coin Set In 1826, during the reign of George IV, a proof or specimen set of coins was issued, containing one example of each of the current coins. This included all four gold coin types, five pound, two pound, sovereign, and half sovereign. The five pound and two pound coins were only issued as proofs, none were issued for circulation. The sets also contained silver and copper coins. Although proof coins had been issued during the reign of George III, these appear to have been produced individually, and we are not aware of any complete proof "set" earlier than 1826. Special Occasions Only Proof sets continued to be issued, on very special and infrequent occasions, from 1826 to 1953. Sometimes these included complete ranges of gold, silver and copper or bronze coins, other sets were issued containing only gold coins, only silver coins, or various combinations. British Gold Sovereigns - Information 1489 or 1817 Although the first British gold sovereign was issued in 1489 for Henry VII, the modern gold sovereign commenced in 1817 under George III. A Real Coin The sovereign was a real circulating coin until the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. At about this time, most countries in the world reduced or stopped production of gold coins for circulation, and switched to a "token" coinage. By 1933, almost every country had stopped gold coin production, and it did not restart until about 1960. Even now, there are no countries where any gold coins regularly circulate as part of the coinage system. Sovereign Production Restarted The production of gold sovereigns, as bullion coins, restarted in 1957. There have been a number of breaks in production. Proofs From 1979, the Royal Mint started to produce special edition proof versions for collectors, and these are now likely to be produced every year. 2000 & The Third Millennium After a break from 1982, the Royal Mint has again started production of "ordinary" sovereigns in 2000, and it is possible that they too will be produced in following years. BRITISH SILVER COINS. This year the Royal Mint has struck a 2009 dated £1 coin in sterling silver to superb Proof quality. This traditional yet contemporary coin is now available for individual purchase.The coin has been struck in sterling silver to Proof quality, the Royal Mint's highest standard The coin is new for 2009 Just 5,000 coins will be made available worldwide The reverse features the shield of the Royal Arms Beautifully presented in a black presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity, attesting to the low issue limit. The 2009 UK Shield of the Royal Arms £1 Silver Proof Coin is the ideal gift for a birthday, christening or an anniversary. In 2009 the most iconic of British cars, the Mini, is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The unique and revolutionary design by Alec Issigonis influenced a generation of carmakers. Over 50 million Minis have been sold worldwide and many ‘classic’ versions are still on the road and loved by their owners. To celebrate this very British anniversary, the Royal Mint has produced a £5 Proof coin in sterling silver and features on its reverse a side-view image of the classic Mini, created by David Cornell FRSA, FRBS. Struck in sterling silver to the highest quality of minting Features a design specially created for this anniversary with an inscription which reads ‘50th Anniversary of the first Mini’ Coin collectors and Mini enthusiasts alike will love this coin Housed in a black presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity telling the extraordinary story of the Mini and its quirky design features Just 2,000 coin collectors and Mini lovers worldwide will be able to own this edition of the silver Proof coin. The 2009 50th Anniversary of the Mini £5 Silver Proof Coin, struck for the Channel Island of Alderney, will make an interesting gift not just for coin collectors but also for Mini enthusiasts. Join in the 50 years of the Mini celebrations by owning this silver coin specially created for the occasion. The 2009 Britannia silver bullion £2 coin features the majestic figure of Britannia by award-winning sculptor Philip Nathan. The largest and purest legal tender coin of the UK, the £2 coin contains one ounce of fine silver. Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve Struck in Britannia silver to uncirculated quality, a higher standard than those found in your pocket Contains one ounce of fine silver The largest and purest legal tender silver coin of the realm Worldwide coin issue limit of 100,000. The 2009 silver bullion £2 Britannia is the ideal affordable gift of silver to give for birthdays, anniversaries or even graduations in 2009. British Silver Britannia British Silver Britannia is a unique fabrication of world renowned Royal Mint first introduced in 1998. The Britannia silver, an admixture of silver comprising 95.84% of silver, with the proportion copper metal is the main element of British Silver Britannia coins. This coin was introduced with the face value of two pounds. These coins bear Britannia standard silver impression and so are widely known as Britannia. The remarkable achievement of Britannia gold bullion coins motivated the Royal Mint to bring out silver bullion coin named British Silver Britannia. During the last few years Silver Britannia coins have come across in several enhancements of their pattern as well as in appearance to captivate the collectors as well as the investors. Each and every year , the pattern of this coin is being altered. GREAT BRITAIN 50th Anniversary of the Mini Alderney Coin Collection In 2009 the most iconic of British cars, the Mini, is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The unique and revolutionary design by Alec Issigonis influenced a generation of carmakers. Over 50 million Minis have been sold worldwide and many ‘classic’ versions are still on the road and loved by their owners. To celebrate this very British anniversary, the Royal Mint has produced a range of coins for the Channel Island of Alderney, featuring a reverse design of a side-view image of the classic Mini.

BRITISH COINS, ANNUAL SETS. The coinage of the United Kingdom is changing. Familiar designs that have served us well for almost 40 years will be replaced by a new set of designs,contemporary in treatment yet grounded in the traditions of the coinage. Now, in a new age, the time has come to rejuvenate the coinage by seeking designs that treat traditional symbols in an innovative and modern way. The series that has been chosen brings new life to the coinage and, like the decimal designs 40 years ago, draws inspiration from the very fabric of British history. The Royal Shield of Arms - The New Designs Revealed The Royal Mint is delighted to reveal to you the new designs that will appear on our coins. Individually, the coins focus on details of the shield of the Royal arms and when placed together they reveal the complete shield. View the new coin designs now Celebrate the Unveiling and Mark the End of an Era This is undoubtedly one of the most significant coin design changes in British history, and to mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering an exciting range of limited-edition collections, giving collectors the opportunity to own a piece of numismatic history. As a powerful symbol of royal authority the Royal Arms, in its various forms, has featured on the coinage of almost every monarch since the reign of Edward III (1327-77). Coins were, and still are, issued under the personal authority of the monarch and came to be regarded as vehicles for royal imagery, whether in the form of a portrait or a monarch's personal Coat of Arms. Virtually unchanged since the reign of Queen Victoria, the Royal Arms is a symbol of the Queen's authority over the whole of the United Kingdom, and has been used to powerful effect by numismatic artists over the course of her reign. The modern £1 coin of 1983 appropriately bore the Royal Arms on its reverse, the detailed depiction by Eric Sewell now a famous symbol of British currency. This was followed in 1988 with a £1 reverse design by Derek Gorringe depicting a crowned shield of the Royal Arms, reminiscent of the early sovereigns of Queen Victoria. It is not surprising then that Matthew Dent chose the Royal Arms, and in particular the shield of the Royal Arms, as the theme for his innovative range of new designs. The Royal Arms is divided into four parts: England being represented by the three lions passant guardant in the first and fourth quarters, the Scottish lion rampant in the second and the harp of Ireland in the third, with all four quarters spread over the six coins from the 1p to the 50p. Completing the new range of coins is the £1 coin featuring the shield of the Royal Arms in its entirety, uniting the six fragmented elements into one design. The New Designs Revealed The new designs have been chosen via an open competition which was widely publicised in the national media in August 2005 and attracted 4,000 entries. The winning designer is 26-year-old Matthew Dent, originally from Bangor who now lives and works in London as a graphic designer. After exploring a number of different options, Matthew Dent finally developed the heraldic theme, taking the greatest heraldic device ever used on coinage - the Royal Arms. As you can see in the image to the right, the Shield of the Royal Arms has been given a contemporary treatment and its whole has been cleverly split among all six denominations from the 1p to the 50p, with the £1 coin displaying the heraldic element in its entirety. This is the first time that a single design has been used across a range of United Kingdom coins. The new designs will enter circulation gradually throughout the year. It is normal practice for banks to order coins from the Royal Mint to satisfy public demand, which fluctuates over the course of the year. The current coin designs will remain in circulation and as legal tender for the foreseeable future. To mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering a range of magnificent limited-edition collections produced to Proof quality. The process of choosing the new designs to replace the familiar heraldic emblems on Britain's circulating coins began with a public competition. The comeptition generated more than 4,000 designs from over 500 people - the largest response to any public competition organised to change the British coinage. Specially invited artists, Royal Mint engravers and artists from other European countries vied with people of all ages and sections of society. The brief allowed those taking part a free hand to prepare a coherent series of designs' and while they were encouraged to explore heraldic emblems and motifs, the door was left open for other ways in which to symbolise Britain. Proof coins are produced to the highest quality. The modern minting process incorporates state-of-the-art technology as well as centuries-old hand skills of Royal Mint craftsmen, which are particularly important in the manufacture of the dies. Master tools are created with great care, minute details of the artist's design being perfected by experienced engravers. To achieve the superior quality of Proof coins, the die is sand blasted with fine particles to give a frosted finish. The surrounding table or field is then carefully hand-polished with diamond paste, a process that takes many hours and considerable skill, resulting in the mirror-like finish. Blanks for Proof coins must be completely free from any blemishes and are polished to a brilliant shine before each one is struck individually at least three times under tremendous pressure between the carefully prepared dies. Finally, each coin is meticulously inspected to ensure that only perfect specimens are placed into protective capsules and sent to collectors. The Royal Mint has issued a superb Brilliant Uncirculated Collection of 11 UK legal tender coins. At the heart of the collection are the new definitive coins by Matthew Dent, which form the shield of the Royal Arms. Bruce Rushin's familiar £2 technology coin, two commemorative £2 coins, one celebrating the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the other marking the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns, are also included together with the 50p piece commemorating the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The coins are beautifully displayed in an informative and fully illustrated presentation folder detailing the history behind the coin designs. Set contains all UK definitive coins for 2009, including Bruce Rushin's £2 technology coin and three new commemorative coins Beautifully displayed in a colourful presentation folder which provides history behind the heraldry of UK coins The first time that the new definitive coins have appeared in a set with the commemorative issues. The perfect gift for anyone celebrating a special occasion in 2009, whether a birth, christening or anniversary, this unique coin collection will make a happy memento. BRITISH SILVER COINS. This year the Royal Mint has struck a 2009 dated £1 coin in sterling silver to superb Proof quality. This traditional yet contemporary coin is now available for individual purchase.The coin has been struck in sterling silver to Proof quality, the Royal Mint's highest standard The coin is new for 2009 Just 5,000 coins will be made available worldwide The reverse features the shield of the Royal Arms Beautifully presented in a black presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity, attesting to the low issue limit. The 2009 UK Shield of the Royal Arms £1 Silver Proof Coin is the ideal gift for a birthday, christening or an anniversary. In 2009 the most iconic of British cars, the Mini, is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The unique and revolutionary design by Alec Issigonis influenced a generation of carmakers. Over 50 million Minis have been sold worldwide and many ‘classic’ versions are still on the road and loved by their owners. To celebrate this very British anniversary, the Royal Mint has produced a £5 Proof coin in sterling silver and features on its reverse a side-view image of the classic Mini, created by David Cornell FRSA, FRBS. Struck in sterling silver to the highest quality of minting Features a design specially created for this anniversary with an inscription which reads ‘50th Anniversary of the first Mini’ Coin collectors and Mini enthusiasts alike will love this coin Housed in a black presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity telling the extraordinary story of the Mini and its quirky design features Just 2,000 coin collectors and Mini lovers worldwide will be able to own this edition of the silver Proof coin. The 2009 50th Anniversary of the Mini £5 Silver Proof Coin, struck for the Channel Island of Alderney, will make an interesting gift not just for coin collectors but also for Mini enthusiasts. Join in the 50 years of the Mini celebrations by owning this silver coin specially created for the occasion. The 2009 Britannia silver bullion £2 coin features the majestic figure of Britannia by award-winning sculptor Philip Nathan. The largest and purest legal tender coin of the UK, the £2 coin contains one ounce of fine silver. Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve Struck in Britannia silver to uncirculated quality, a higher standard than those found in your pocket Contains one ounce of fine silver The largest and purest legal tender silver coin of the realm Worldwide coin issue limit of 100,000. The 2009 silver bullion £2 Britannia is the ideal affordable gift of silver to give for birthdays, anniversaries or even graduations in 2009. British Silver Britannia British Silver Britannia is a unique fabrication of world renowned Royal Mint first introduced in 1998. The Britannia silver, an admixture of silver comprising 95.84% of silver, with the proportion copper metal is the main element of British Silver Britannia coins. This coin was introduced with the face value of two pounds. These coins bear Britannia standard silver impression and so are widely known as Britannia. The remarkable achievement of Britannia gold bullion coins motivated the Royal Mint to bring out silver bullion coin named British Silver Britannia. During the last few years Silver Britannia coins have come across in several enhancements of their pattern as well as in appearance to captivate the collectors as well as the investors. Each and every year , the pattern of this coin is being altered. GREAT BRITAIN 50th Anniversary of the Mini Alderney Coin Collection In 2009 the most iconic of British cars, the Mini, is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The unique and revolutionary design by Alec Issigonis influenced a generation of carmakers. Over 50 million Minis have been sold worldwide and many ‘classic’ versions are still on the road and loved by their owners. To celebrate this very British anniversary, the Royal Mint has produced a range of coins for the Channel Island of Alderney, featuring a reverse design of a side-view image of the classic Mini. The coinage of the United Kingdom is changing. Familiar designs that have served us well for almost 40 years will be replaced by a new set of designs, contemporary in treatment yet grounded in the traditions of the coinage. Now, in a new age, the time has come to rejuvenate the coinage by seeking designs that treat traditional symbols in an innovative and modern way. The series that has been chosen brings new life to the coinage and, like the decimal designs 40 years ago, draws inspiration from the very fabric of British history. The Royal Shield of Arms - The New Designs Revealed The Royal Mint is delighted to reveal to you the new designs that will appear on our coins. Individually, the coins focus on details of the shield of the Royal arms and when placed together they reveal the complete shield. View the new coin designs now Celebrate the Unveiling and Mark the End of an Era This is undoubtedly one of the most significant coin design changes in British history, and to mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering an exciting range of limited-edition collections, giving collectors the opportunity to own a piece of numismatic history Collector Coin product range: Platinum Range 2008 Royal Shield of Arms Platinum Proof Collection Emblems of Britain and Royal Shield of Arms Platinum Proof Collection 2008 Emblems of Britain Platinum Proof Collection Gold Range 2008 Royal Shield of Arms Gold Proof Collection The Emblems of Britain and Royal Shield of Arms Gold Proof Collection 2008 Emblems of Britain Gold Proof Collection Silver Range 2008 Emblems of Britain Silver Proof Collection Base Metal Range 2008 Emblems of Britain 2008 Britannia - Defender of the ShoresWhen designer John Bergdahl was asked to interpret the iconic figure of Britannia, he produced four different drawings before finally, at the fifth, he arrived at a very personal image that sums up everything Britain means to him. His design, which appears on the reverse of the new limited-edition range of Britannia coins, shows, in John's words, 'a younger Britannia, and a warrior maiden at one with the elements, representing Britain.' One of a number of designers asked to put forward designs for the coin, John says it wasn't until the last of a series of drawings that the elements finally came together in the form subsequently chosen to appear on the coin. 'I tend to work out my ideas on paper,' he says. 'I prepared five drawings which I submitted, but it wasn't until the fifth that things started to gel. That one brought together all the things I wanted to say and felt about Britannia and about Britain.' The 2008 Britannia is commanding, standing proudly between land and sea with her face towards crested waves that are formed from her robes. To the right of her is featured a lighthouse, an image that traditionally appears on coinage designs of Britannia. For John, Britannia represents a nation with a rich maritime heritage. 'It is not just that we are surrounded by sea,' he says. 'The nation was forged from the sea in as much as the Romans, Danes, Vikings, Angles and Saxons all came here and made us what we are - we're a fairly diverse race. Britain is not just set in the sea, the British people are at one with the sea - that is where I came to with this particular Britannia. She comes from the waves and the waves become her.' These are not the ideas that the designer started out with - rather they crystallised as he worked. 'Things come to the surface as I draw,' says John. 'Then I start to realise where I'm going. It's almost like writing a character in a novel - they come to the point where the character starts to take over and narrates its own story.' John Bergdahl is a freelance designer and silversmith who trained as an heraldic engraver. He has been designing coins and medals since 1970. He has previously taken on commissions for the Royal Mint, but this is the first time one of his designs has appeared on legal tender coins of the United Kingdom. History of the Royal Mint - IntroductionTower of London From the end of the thirteenth century until the start of the nineteenth, the Royal Mint was located in the Tower of London. Stretched out in the narrow passage between the inner and outer walls, the Royal Mint occupied buildings which ran for 400 feet around the three sides of the fortress not bounded by the river. More > Tower Hill With additional space being required to allow the installation of steam-powered machinery, the Royal Mint left the Tower at the beginning of the nineteenth century and moved to a purpose-built facility on nearby Tower Hill. To the Royal Mint officers, accustomed to the cramped conditions in the Tower, the new site was 'simple, beautiful and effectual'. In the 1880s the factory buildings were reconstructed and extended. Further rebuilding was undertaken at the turn of the century with steam giving way to electricity. The work of construction and renovation became a continuous process as the Royal Mint endeavoured to cope with the enormous increase in its output. By the 1960s little of the original mint remained, apart from the dignified main building and the massive gatehouses which still stand today. Llantrisant The striking of more and more coins for overseas countries placed a tremendous strain upon the four-and-a-half acre Tower Hill site but it was the exceptionally large requirements arising from decimalisation that finally necessitated the building of a new mint. In accordance with government policy of moving industry away from the capital, several sites were considered in development areas including Cumbernauld near Glasgow, Runcorn on Merseyside and Washington in County Durham. The final decision, however, was in favour of Llantrisant in South Wales set in the rolling green countryside on the edge of the Rhondda Valley. The Royal Mint contributes to millions of lives every day, in the United Kingdom and around the world. At home it supplies the coins that are crucial to the daily transactions that underpin life, and as a profit-making Executive Agency of the British government it contributes to the public purse. As a manufacturer, exporter and employer it has a real stake in the industrial life of the nation, and as a maker of beautifully crafted collector coins it gives pleasure and opportunities to many. Beyond the United Kingdom the Royal Mint supplies some 100 issuing authorities around the world with coins and blanks. Blanks are metal discs, which are minted into coins. It is the leading export mint, with around 15 per cent of the worldwide market. With the Royal Mint's unique position comes responsibilities. The best customer service, the highest production standards and true shareholder values are watchwords for the business. The quest for continued and sustainable profits is led through winning new customers and pleasing existing clients, while at the same time reducing costs by making production more efficient and cutting out waste. The Royal Mint Celebrates 45oth Anniversary of Accession of Queen Elizabeth I The Royal Mint has unveiled a striking new design for a £5 crown minted especially to markthe 450th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth I's accession to the throne. Featuring a stunning portrait of one of history's greatest monarchs, this coin is certain to be sought after by collectors, especially as only a limited number will be available: 1,500 gold Proof crowns and 20,000 silver Proof crowns. The coin's designer, the renowned silversmith, Rod Kelly, has created a bold and highly decorative design which depicts Queen Elizabeth I, set within a symbolic Mandorla or 'almond like shape'. The Mandorla is often used in traditional Christian art to frame the figures of Christ or the Virgin Mary, while the almond seed is associated with divine virgin birth. Other beautifully rendered details such as the roses, the leaf pattern and the lettering also allude to Queen Elizabeth I's reign.The leaf design is deliberately reminiscent of the carvings made by Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, while he was awaiting execution in the Tower of London, and the Roman numerals mark the year of the Queen's accession 1558, and 2008 as the anniversary year.In addition, the inscription around the edge of the coin, 'I HAVE REIGNED WITH YOUR LOVE',is taken from Queen Elizabeth I's Golden Speech delivered to her last Parliament on 30 November 1601. Rod Kelly said: 'The portrait is a combination of several portraits, with the crown signifying a monarch, and the ruff, the dress and the face as painted by George Gower in 1588. The design encapsulates several of the important points established during Elizabeth's reign.' Dave Knight, Marketing Director of The Royal Mint said, 'The Elizabeth I Anniversary crown is a great memento that not only honours one of the most influential British monarchs, but also celebrates the start of one of the most remarkable periods in our country's history. We are delighted with Rod Kelly's design, which truly captures the essence of this extraordinary figure and her sovereignty.' The accession of Queen Elizabeth I was a key moment in history, marking the start of a 45-year reign, considered to be one of the most successful and glorious in English history.Deemed the Golden Age, it was a period when the arts and literature flourished, trade and industry thrived, and many successful voyages and discoveries were made by men like Francis Drake, Walter Raleigh and Humphrey Gilbert.Accession Day or Queen's Day was celebrated annually at Queen Elizabeth I's court with a series of elaborate festivals and continued to be a national holiday in England for 200 years. The 2008 Queen Elizabeth I £5 Crownis available in gold at £925.00 with a limited issue of 1,500,in silver at £39.95 with a limited issue of 20,000, and in base metal as a £2 Brilliant Uncirculated coin at £9.95, with a limited issue of 500,000.The obverse of the coin, common to all United Kingdom coinage,bears the portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS. The CollectionThe Royal Mint maintains one of the finest numismatic collections in the world. A living and working collection, it reflects the changing practical needs of the Royal Mint. The collection was established in 1816 by the Master of the Mint, William Wellesley Pole. One of his main objectives was to provide Royal Mint engravers with an inspirational source of material to which they could refer when preparing new coin designs. In 1818 the collection was greatly enhanced when the Royal Mint was presented with more than 2,000 coins and medals from the collection of the late Sarah Sophia Banks. The gift was a handsome one, from ancient British to contemporary machine-made coins, and it still forms the basis of the pre-1800 part of the Royal Mint collection. Today the collection contains approximately 70,000 coins including an abundance of proofs, patterns and trial pieces. Medals and seals are also well represented along with plaster models, electrotypes, balances, weights and numerous original drawings by numismatic artists. Above all, perhaps, it incorporates roughly 30,000 master tools and dies, a collection whose importance is unrivalled in the United Kingdom. Very much a part of the day-to-day activities at Llantrisant, the collection serves a variety of purposes within the Royal Mint. The Commemorative Coins Department, in particular, draws heavily upon the collection and the numismatic expertise of its staff to ensure that literature is accurate and well illustrated. Furthermore, to provide as complete a service as possible, the staff answers hundreds of enquiries every year from members of the public and delivers lectures on a regular basis to national and local numismatic societies. Although not open to members of the public, the collection is made accessible to numismatists and scholars by appointment. Furthermore, to ensure that material from the collection is seen by as many people as possible, items are frequently loaned for exhibitions at other museums and art galleries.

BRITISH GOLD COINS. The modern sovereign made its appearance in 1817 and came to be known as ‘the chief coin of the world’. Now, in 2009, the sovereign has again been struck in 22 carat gold using original nineteenth-century tools and featuring the classic portrayal of St George and the dragon. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time The sovereign unusually features Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the helmet minus its streamer Low issue limit of just 12,500 Presented in a walnut-veneer case with a numbered Certificate of Authenticity. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available struck to the highest Proof quality and presented in a case accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity attesting to the low issue of 12,500. The 2009 UK Gold Proof Sovereign is the ideal gift on the occasion of a special anniversary, important birthday or celebrating a graduation in 2009 For centuries gold has been praised for its beauty and value. Now the Royal Mint brings you an affordable way to appreciate its precious qualities with an opportunity to purchase the 2009 Gold Bullion Sovereign. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time in the modern production process The sovereign features Benedetto Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the same individual characteristics as the coins of the 1820s Struck in 22 carat gold to uncirculated quality Worldwide issue limit of 75,000 Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available within a specially designed outer sleeve to reflect the famous coin design of St George and the dragon. From the arrival of a baby, to a wedding, to retirement or special anniversary, a 2009 bullion sovereign from the Royal Mint makes an ideal and timeless gift of gold. Following its introduction in 2008, the new definitive £1 is now available individually. Struck to gold Proof quality, the coin is displayed in a walnut-veneer case. The coin has been struck in 22 carat gold to Proof quality, the Royal Mint's highest standard The coin is new for 2009 Only 1,000 gold Proof coins will be available worldwide Receive a Designing Change book, personally signed by the editor Dr Kevin Clancy, absolutely FREE when you purchase the £1 gold Proof Coin The reverse features the shield of the Royal Arms As a legal tender coin of the UK, the obverse features the current portrait of Her Majesty The Queen by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS Beautifully presented in a walnut-veneer presentation case and accompanied by an individually numbered Certificate of Authenticity. This beautiful gold coin will make the perfect gift for the extra special person in your life. It is also suitable for collectors who are interested in British coinage and its history. To celebrate the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns the Royal Mint is issuing a series of UK commemorative £2 coins. One of Scotland’s favourite sons, Robert Burns was a passionate poet and lyricist as well as a witty satirist of his religious and political peers. His most famous work is perhaps Auld Lang Syne, a song celebrating friendship and sung every year on New Year’s Eve in the English-speaking world. The coin has been struck to Proof quality - the Royal Mint’s highest standard The commemorative reverse features an extract from Auld Lang Syne, in Burns’ own handwriting As a legal tender coin of the UK, the obverse features the current portrait of Her Majesty The Queen by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS Ideal to present as a gift. Anyone with an interest in the famous poet Robert Burns would be delighted to receive this coin to celebrate the 250th anniversary of his birth. It makes an ideal retirement or birthday gift as well as an anniversary gift. Struck in 22 carat gold, this beautiful half-sovereign embodies almost two centuries of numismatic tradition, making this limited-edition coin highly sought after. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time in the modern production process The half-sovereign features Benedetto Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the same characteristics as the coins of 1893 Struck in 22 carat gold to uncirculated quality Worldwide issue limit of 50,000 Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available within a specially designed outer sleeve to reflect the famous coin design of St George and the dragon. The 2009 bullion half-sovereign is the ideal gift on the occasion of a special anniversary, important birthday or celebrating a graduation in 2009. Sovereigns As Gold Bullion Ancient History When the world's first coins were produced in the seventh century B.C., they were simply a measured and guaranteed amount of precious metal, gold or silver, of a known purity. Almost three thousand years later, at the beginning of the twentieth century, the currency value of most coins was close to that of their intrinsic precious metal content , their bullion value. Gold has almost always been the preferred security for most currencies. Governments and central banks store much of their gold bullion in the form of 400 ounce bullion bars, but also maintain stocks of gold in the form of gold coins. The 20th Century For Great Britain, the obvious choice of bullion coin is the gold sovereign, and many other central and commercial banks keep a proportion of their gold bullion in the form of British gold sovereigns. The start of the first world war caused a major change in coins and currency the entire world over. Countries moved their currencies off the "gold standard". Within a decade, most countries converted to using paper money, and a token coinage, token meaning that the underlying bullion value would be much less than their face value. The Second Millennium It is only natural that at times of uncertainty, people everywhere seek to protect their assets from potential disasters. Whether it be fears of the millennium bug, worries about the "Euro", the end of the pound sterling, the collapse of the rouble, there are sound arguments for retaining at least a small proportion of surplus wealth in an ultra secure investment form. Gold has performed this traditional role since before the first coins came into existence. As one of the worlds oldest, most historic, and most recognisable gold coins, the gold sovereign makes an ideal bullion coin. Sovereigns weigh 7.98 grams and are made of 22 carat gold (carat means 1/24) or 91.66% pure, and therefore contains 7.315 grams or 0.2353544 troy ounces of pure gold. 2009 Gold Sovereigns The 2009 sovereigns are expected to have the familiar St. George and Dragon design. St. George and Dragon - Recut 2009 Reverse Dies The traditional St George & Dragon design has been used on sovereigns, with a few breaks, since 1817. During this long period, there have been a considerable number of minor changes to the dies used for the reverse (tail side). In 2007, the reverse design appears to have been completely re-engraved, although there was no advance announcement of this from the Royal Mint. The 2009 reverse dies have again been re-engraved, using "original Victorian tools". For details use the link from the heading of this paragraph. British Gold Sovereigns In 1816 the gold British Sovereign was first introduced, and as the British Empire expanded under Queen Victoria during the 1800’s, this coin came to be the world’s most widely distributed gold coin. Minted originally in London, the Sovereign came to be minted all over the world as Australia and South Africa came to be large gold producers. Mints in Pretoria, Bombay, Ottawa, Melbourne, Perth, and Sydney turned out hundreds of millions of Sovereigns during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Because of the huge output of gold Sovereigns at that time, and the fact that they have been traded and hoarded all over the world ever since, these roughly nickel-sized gold coins are available today at bullion prices. Although these coins are sometimes promoted as ‘scarce" and marked up outrageously by numismatic sales companies, in fact, they are currently available at bullion prices. These handsome coins portray the reigning monarch on one side, and Pestrucci's St. George and the Dragon on the other side. Gold Sovereigns were struck in the traditional 22karat (.917 fine gold) as were most gold coins made for circulation. The coins weigh 8 grams and contain just under a quarter-ounce of gold (.2354 troy ounce) As an international gold coin, the gold Sovereign has no equal. Whether in Cairo, Hong Kong, Beijing, Moscow, or nearly any spot on the globe, this coin commands instant recognition. Gold Coin Sets The First Coin Set In 1826, during the reign of George IV, a proof or specimen set of coins was issued, containing one example of each of the current coins. This included all four gold coin types, five pound, two pound, sovereign, and half sovereign. The five pound and two pound coins were only issued as proofs, none were issued for circulation. The sets also contained silver and copper coins. Although proof coins had been issued during the reign of George III, these appear to have been produced individually, and we are not aware of any complete proof "set" earlier than 1826. Special Occasions Only Proof sets continued to be issued, on very special and infrequent occasions, from 1826 to 1953. Sometimes these included complete ranges of gold, silver and copper or bronze coins, other sets were issued containing only gold coins, only silver coins, or various combinations. British Gold Sovereigns - Information 1489 or 1817 Although the first British gold sovereign was issued in 1489 for Henry VII, the modern gold sovereign commenced in 1817 under George III. A Real Coin The sovereign was a real circulating coin until the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. At about this time, most countries in the world reduced or stopped production of gold coins for circulation, and switched to a "token" coinage. By 1933, almost every country had stopped gold coin production, and it did not restart until about 1960. Even now, there are no countries where any gold coins regularly circulate as part of the coinage system. Sovereign Production Restarted The production of gold sovereigns, as bullion coins, restarted in 1957. There have been a number of breaks in production. Proofs From 1979, the Royal Mint started to produce special edition proof versions for collectors, and these are now likely to be produced every year. 2000 & The Third Millennium After a break from 1982, the Royal Mint has again started production of "ordinary" sovereigns in 2000, and it is possible that they too will be produced in following years.

British Coins

BRITISH COINS, British Annual sets, British Annual coin sets, British Gold coins, British Gold Sovereign, British Silver coins.. The coinage of the United Kingdom is changing. Familiar designs that have served us well for almost 40 years will be replaced by a new set of designs, contemporary in treatment yet grounded in the traditions of the coinage. Now, in a new age, the time has come to rejuvenate the coinage by seeking designs that treat traditional symbols in an innovative and modern way. The series that has been chosen brings new life to the coinage and, like the decimal designs 40 years ago, draws inspiration from the very fabric of British history. The Royal Shield of Arms - The New Designs Revealed The Royal Mint is delighted to reveal to you the new designs that will appear on our coins. Individually, the coins focus on details of the shield of the Royal arms and when placed together they reveal the complete shield. View the new coin designs now Celebrate the Unveiling and Mark the End of an Era This is undoubtedly one of the most significant coin design changes in British history, and to mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering an exciting range of limited-edition collections, giving collectors the opportunity to own a piece of numismatic history. As a powerful symbol of royal authority the Royal Arms, in its various forms, has featured on the coinage of almost every monarch since the reign of Edward III (1327-77). Coins were, and still are, issued under the personal authority of the monarch and came to be regarded as vehicles for royal imagery, whether in the form of a portrait or a monarch's personal Coat of Arms. Virtually unchanged since the reign of Queen Victoria, the Royal Arms is a symbol of the Queen's authority over the whole of the United Kingdom, and has been used to powerful effect by numismatic artists over the course of her reign. The modern £1 coin of 1983 appropriately bore the Royal Arms on its reverse, the detailed depiction by Eric Sewell now a famous symbol of British currency. This was followed in 1988 with a £1 reverse design by Derek Gorringe depicting a crowned shield of the Royal Arms, reminiscent of the early sovereigns of Queen Victoria. It is not surprising then that Matthew Dent chose the Royal Arms, and in particular the shield of the Royal Arms, as the theme for his innovative range of new designs. The Royal Arms is divided into four parts: England being represented by the three lions passant guardant in the first and fourth quarters, the Scottish lion rampant in the second and the harp of Ireland in the third, with all four quarters spread over the six coins from the 1p to the 50p. Completing the new range of coins is the £1 coin featuring the shield of the Royal Arms in its entirety, uniting the six fragmented elements into one design. The New Designs Revealed The new designs have been chosen via an open competition which was widely publicized in the national media in August 2005 and attracted 4,000 entries. The winning designer is 26-year-old Matthew Dent, originally from Bangor who now lives and works in London as a graphic designer. After exploring a number of different options, Matthew Dent finally developed the heraldic theme, taking the greatest heraldic device ever used on coinage - the Royal Arms. As you can see in the image to the right, the Shield of the Royal Arms has been given a contemporary treatment and its whole has been cleverly split among all six denominations from the 1p to the 50p, with the £1 coin displaying the heraldic element in its entirety. This is the first time that a single design has been used across a range of United Kingdom coins. The new designs will enter circulation gradually throughout the year. It is normal practice for banks to order coins from the Royal Mint to satisfy public demand, which fluctuates over the course of the year. The current coin designs will remain in circulation and as legal tender for the foreseeable future. To mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering a range of magnificent limited-edition collections produced to Proof quality. The process of choosing the new designs to replace the familiar heraldic emblems on Britain's circulating coins began with a public competition. The competition generated more than 4,000 designs from over 500 people - the largest response to any public competition organized to change the British coinage. Specially invited artists, Royal Mint engravers and artists from other European countries vied with people of all ages and sections of society. The brief allowed those taking part a free hand to prepare a coherent series of designs' and while they were encouraged to explore heraldic emblems and motifs, the door was left open for other ways in which to symbolize Britain. Proof coins are produced to the highest quality. The modern minting process incorporates state-of-the-art technology as well as centuries-old hand skills of Royal Mint craftsmen, which are particularly important in the manufacture of the dies. Master tools are created with great care, minute details of the artist's design being perfected by experienced engravers. To achieve the superior quality of Proof coins, the die is sand blasted with fine particles to give a frosted finish. The surrounding table or field is then carefully hand-polished with diamond paste, a process that takes many hours and considerable skill, resulting in the mirror-like finish. Blanks for Proof coins must be completely free from any blemishes and are polished to a brilliant shine before each one is struck individually at least three times under tremendous pressure between the carefully prepared dies. Finally, each coin is meticulously inspected to ensure that only perfect specimens are placed into protective capsules and sent to collectors. The Royal Mint has issued a superb Brilliant Uncirculated Collection of 11 UK legal tender coins. At the heart of the collection are the new definitive coins by Matthew Dent, which form the shield of the Royal Arms. Bruce Rushin's familiar £2 technology coin, two commemorative £2 coins, one celebrating the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the other marking the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns, are also included together with the 50p piece commemorating the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The coins are beautifully displayed in an informative and fully illustrated presentation folder detailing the history behind the coin designs. Set contains all UK definitive coins for 2009, including Bruce Rushin's £2 technology coin and three new commemorative coins Beautifully displayed in a colourful presentation folder which provides history behind the heraldry of UK coins The first time that the new definitive coins have appeared in a set with the commemorative issues. The perfect gift for anyone celebrating a special occasion in 2009, whether a birth, christening or anniversary, this unique coin collection will make a happy memento.

BRITISH GOLD COINS. The modern sovereign made its appearance in 1817 and came to be known as ‘the chief coin of the world’. Now, in 2009, the sovereign has again been struck in 22 carat gold using original nineteenth-century tools and featuring the classic portrayal of St George and the dragon. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time The sovereign unusually features Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the helmet minus its streamer Low issue limit of just 12,500 Presented in a walnut-veneer case with a numbered Certificate of Authenticity. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available struck to the highest Proof quality and presented in a case accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity attesting to the low issue of 12,500. The 2009 UK Gold Proof Sovereign is the ideal gift on the occasion of a special anniversary, important birthday or celebrating a graduation in 2009 For centuries gold has been praised for its beauty and value. Now the Royal Mint brings you an affordable way to appreciate its precious qualities with an opportunity to purchase the 2009 Gold Bullion Sovereign. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time in the modern production process The sovereign features Benedetto Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the same individual characteristics as the coins of the 1820s Struck in 22 carat gold to uncirculated quality Worldwide issue limit of 75,000 Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available within a specially designed outer sleeve to reflect the famous coin design of St George and the dragon. From the arrival of a baby, to a wedding, to retirement or special anniversary, a 2009 bullion sovereign from the Royal Mint makes an ideal and timeless gift of gold. Following its introduction in 2008, the new definitive £1 is now available individually. Struck to gold Proof quality, the coin is displayed in a walnut-veneer case. The coin has been struck in 22 carat gold to Proof quality, the Royal Mint's highest standard The coin is new for 2009 Only 1,000 gold Proof coins will be available worldwide Receive a Designing Change book, personally signed by the editor Dr Kevin Clancy, absolutely FREE when you purchase the £1 gold Proof Coin The reverse features the shield of the Royal Arms As a legal tender coin of the UK, the obverse features the current portrait of Her Majesty The Queen by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS Beautifully presented in a walnut-veneer presentation case and accompanied by an individually numbered Certificate of Authenticity. This beautiful gold coin will make the perfect gift for the extra special person in your life. It is also suitable for collectors who are interested in British coinage and its history. To celebrate the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns the Royal Mint is issuing a series of UK commemorative £2 coins. One of Scotland’s favourite sons, Robert Burns was a passionate poet and lyricist as well as a witty satirist of his religious and political peers. His most famous work is perhaps Auld Lang Syne, a song celebrating friendship and sung every year on New Year’s Eve in the English-speaking world. The coin has been struck to Proof quality - the Royal Mint’s highest standard The commemorative reverse features an extract from Auld Lang Syne, in Burns’ own handwriting As a legal tender coin of the UK, the obverse features the current portrait of Her Majesty The Queen by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS Ideal to present as a gift. Anyone with an interest in the famous poet Robert Burns would be delighted to receive this coin to celebrate the 250th anniversary of his birth. It makes an ideal retirement or birthday gift as well as an anniversary gift. Struck in 22 carat gold, this beautiful half-sovereign embodies almost two centuries of numismatic tradition, making this limited-edition coin highly sought after. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time in the modern production process The half-sovereign features Benedetto Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the same characteristics as the coins of 1893 Struck in 22 carat gold to uncirculated quality Worldwide issue limit of 50,000 Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available within a specially designed outer sleeve to reflect the famous coin design of St George and the dragon. The 2009 bullion half-sovereign is the ideal gift on the occasion of a special anniversary, important birthday or celebrating a graduation in 2009. Sovereigns As Gold Bullion Ancient History When the world's first coins were produced in the seventh century B.C., they were simply a measured and guaranteed amount of precious metal, gold or silver, of a known purity. Almost three thousand years later, at the beginning of the twentieth century, the currency value of most coins was close to that of their intrinsic precious metal content , their bullion value. Gold has almost always been the preferred security for most currencies. Governments and central banks store much of their gold bullion in the form of 400 ounce bullion bars, but also maintain stocks of gold in the form of gold coins. The 20th Century For Great Britain, the obvious choice of bullion coin is the gold sovereign, and many other central and commercial banks keep a proportion of their gold bullion in the form of British gold sovereigns. The start of the first world war caused a major change in coins and currency the entire world over. Countries moved their currencies off the "gold standard". Within a decade, most countries converted to using paper money, and a token coinage, token meaning that the underlying bullion value would be much less than their face value. The Second Millennium It is only natural that at times of uncertainty, people everywhere seek to protect their assets from potential disasters. Whether it be fears of the millennium bug, worries about the "Euro", the end of the pound sterling, the collapse of the rouble, there are sound arguments for retaining at least a small proportion of surplus wealth in an ultra secure investment form. Gold has performed this traditional role since before the first coins came into existence. As one of the worlds oldest, most historic, and most recognisable gold coins, the gold sovereign makes an ideal bullion coin. Sovereigns weigh 7.98 grams and are made of 22 carat gold (carat means 1/24) or 91.66% pure, and therefore contains 7.315 grams or 0.2353544 troy ounces of pure gold. 2009 Gold Sovereigns The 2009 sovereigns are expected to have the familiar St. George and Dragon design. St. George and Dragon - Recut 2009 Reverse Dies The traditional St George & Dragon design has been used on sovereigns, with a few breaks, since 1817. During this long period, there have been a considerable number of minor changes to the dies used for the reverse (tail side). In 2007, the reverse design appears to have been completely re-engraved, although there was no advance announcement of this from the Royal Mint. The 2009 reverse dies have again been re-engraved, using "original Victorian tools". For details use the link from the heading of this paragraph. British Gold Sovereigns In 1816 the gold British Sovereign was first introduced, and as the British Empire expanded under Queen Victoria during the 1800’s, this coin came to be the world’s most widely distributed gold coin. Minted originally in London, the Sovereign came to be minted all over the world as Australia and South Africa came to be large gold producers. Mints in Pretoria, Bombay, Ottawa, Melbourne, Perth, and Sydney turned out hundreds of millions of Sovereigns during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Because of the huge output of gold Sovereigns at that time, and the fact that they have been traded and hoarded all over the world ever since, these roughly nickel-sized gold coins are available today at bullion prices. Although these coins are sometimes promoted as ‘scarce" and marked up outrageously by numismatic sales companies, in fact, they are currently available at bullion prices. These handsome coins portray the reigning monarch on one side, and Pestrucci's St. George and the Dragon on the other side. Gold Sovereigns were struck in the traditional 22karat (.917 fine gold) as were most gold coins made for circulation. The coins weigh 8 grams and contain just under a quarter-ounce of gold (.2354 troy ounce) As an international gold coin, the gold Sovereign has no equal. Whether in Cairo, Hong Kong, Beijing, Moscow, or nearly any spot on the globe, this coin commands instant recognition. Gold Coin Sets The First Coin Set In 1826, during the reign of George IV, a proof or specimen set of coins was issued, containing one example of each of the current coins. This included all four gold coin types, five pound, two pound, sovereign, and half sovereign. The five pound and two pound coins were only issued as proofs, none were issued for circulation. The sets also contained silver and copper coins. Although proof coins had been issued during the reign of George III, these appear to have been produced individually, and we are not aware of any complete proof "set" earlier than 1826. Special Occasions Only Proof sets continued to be issued, on very special and infrequent occasions, from 1826 to 1953. Sometimes these included complete ranges of gold, silver and copper or bronze coins, other sets were issued containing only gold coins, only silver coins, or various combinations. British Gold Sovereigns - Information 1489 or 1817 Although the first British gold sovereign was issued in 1489 for Henry VII, the modern gold sovereign commenced in 1817 under George III. A Real Coin The sovereign was a real circulating coin until the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. At about this time, most countries in the world reduced or stopped production of gold coins for circulation, and switched to a "token" coinage. By 1933, almost every country had stopped gold coin production, and it did not restart until about 1960. Even now, there are no countries where any gold coins regularly circulate as part of the coinage system. Sovereign Production Restarted The production of gold sovereigns, as bullion coins, restarted in 1957. There have been a number of breaks in production. Proofs From 1979, the Royal Mint started to produce special edition proof versions for collectors, and these are now likely to be produced every year. 2000 & The Third Millennium After a break from 1982, the Royal Mint has again started production of "ordinary" sovereigns in 2000, and it is possible that they too will be produced in following years. BRITISH SILVER COINS. This year the Royal Mint has struck a 2009 dated £1 coin in sterling silver to superb Proof quality. This traditional yet contemporary coin is now available for individual purchase.The coin has been struck in sterling silver to Proof quality, the Royal Mint's highest standard The coin is new for 2009 Just 5,000 coins will be made available worldwide The reverse features the shield of the Royal Arms Beautifully presented in a black presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity, attesting to the low issue limit. The 2009 UK Shield of the Royal Arms £1 Silver Proof Coin is the ideal gift for a birthday, christening or an anniversary. In 2009 the most iconic of British cars, the Mini, is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The unique and revolutionary design by Alec Issigonis influenced a generation of carmakers. Over 50 million Minis have been sold worldwide and many ‘classic’ versions are still on the road and loved by their owners. To celebrate this very British anniversary, the Royal Mint has produced a £5 Proof coin in sterling silver and features on its reverse a side-view image of the classic Mini, created by David Cornell FRSA, FRBS. Struck in sterling silver to the highest quality of minting Features a design specially created for this anniversary with an inscription which reads ‘50th Anniversary of the first Mini’ Coin collectors and Mini enthusiasts alike will love this coin Housed in a black presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity telling the extraordinary story of the Mini and its quirky design features Just 2,000 coin collectors and Mini lovers worldwide will be able to own this edition of the silver Proof coin. The 2009 50th Anniversary of the Mini £5 Silver Proof Coin, struck for the Channel Island of Alderney, will make an interesting gift not just for coin collectors but also for Mini enthusiasts. Join in the 50 years of the Mini celebrations by owning this silver coin specially created for the occasion. The 2009 Britannia silver bullion £2 coin features the majestic figure of Britannia by award-winning sculptor Philip Nathan. The largest and purest legal tender coin of the UK, the £2 coin contains one ounce of fine silver. Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve Struck in Britannia silver to uncirculated quality, a higher standard than those found in your pocket Contains one ounce of fine silver The largest and purest legal tender silver coin of the realm Worldwide coin issue limit of 100,000. The 2009 silver bullion £2 Britannia is the ideal affordable gift of silver to give for birthdays, anniversaries or even graduations in 2009. British Silver Britannia British Silver Britannia is a unique fabrication of world renowned Royal Mint first introduced in 1998. The Britannia silver, an admixture of silver comprising 95.84% of silver, with the proportion copper metal is the main element of British Silver Britannia coins. This coin was introduced with the face value of two pounds. These coins bear Britannia standard silver impression and so are widely known as Britannia. The remarkable achievement of Britannia gold bullion coins motivated the Royal Mint to bring out silver bullion coin named British Silver Britannia. During the last few years Silver Britannia coins have come across in several enhancements of their pattern as well as in appearance to captivate the collectors as well as the investors. Each and every year , the pattern of this coin is being altered. GREAT BRITAIN 50th Anniversary of the Mini Alderney Coin Collection In 2009 the most iconic of British cars, the Mini, is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The unique and revolutionary design by Alec Issigonis influenced a generation of carmakers. Over 50 million Minis have been sold worldwide and many ‘classic’ versions are still on the road and loved by their owners. To celebrate this very British anniversary, the Royal Mint has produced a range of coins for the Channel Island of Alderney, featuring a reverse design of a side-view image of the classic Mini.

BRITISH COINS, ANNUAL SETS. The coinage of the United Kingdom is changing. Familiar designs that have served us well for almost 40 years will be replaced by a new set of designs,contemporary in treatment yet grounded in the traditions of the coinage. Now, in a new age, the time has come to rejuvenate the coinage by seeking designs that treat traditional symbols in an innovative and modern way. The series that has been chosen brings new life to the coinage and, like the decimal designs 40 years ago, draws inspiration from the very fabric of British history. The Royal Shield of Arms - The New Designs Revealed The Royal Mint is delighted to reveal to you the new designs that will appear on our coins. Individually, the coins focus on details of the shield of the Royal arms and when placed together they reveal the complete shield. View the new coin designs now Celebrate the Unveiling and Mark the End of an Era This is undoubtedly one of the most significant coin design changes in British history, and to mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering an exciting range of limited-edition collections, giving collectors the opportunity to own a piece of numismatic history. As a powerful symbol of royal authority the Royal Arms, in its various forms, has featured on the coinage of almost every monarch since the reign of Edward III (1327-77). Coins were, and still are, issued under the personal authority of the monarch and came to be regarded as vehicles for royal imagery, whether in the form of a portrait or a monarch's personal Coat of Arms. Virtually unchanged since the reign of Queen Victoria, the Royal Arms is a symbol of the Queen's authority over the whole of the United Kingdom, and has been used to powerful effect by numismatic artists over the course of her reign. The modern £1 coin of 1983 appropriately bore the Royal Arms on its reverse, the detailed depiction by Eric Sewell now a famous symbol of British currency. This was followed in 1988 with a £1 reverse design by Derek Gorringe depicting a crowned shield of the Royal Arms, reminiscent of the early sovereigns of Queen Victoria. It is not surprising then that Matthew Dent chose the Royal Arms, and in particular the shield of the Royal Arms, as the theme for his innovative range of new designs. The Royal Arms is divided into four parts: England being represented by the three lions passant guardant in the first and fourth quarters, the Scottish lion rampant in the second and the harp of Ireland in the third, with all four quarters spread over the six coins from the 1p to the 50p. Completing the new range of coins is the £1 coin featuring the shield of the Royal Arms in its entirety, uniting the six fragmented elements into one design. The New Designs Revealed The new designs have been chosen via an open competition which was widely publicised in the national media in August 2005 and attracted 4,000 entries. The winning designer is 26-year-old Matthew Dent, originally from Bangor who now lives and works in London as a graphic designer. After exploring a number of different options, Matthew Dent finally developed the heraldic theme, taking the greatest heraldic device ever used on coinage - the Royal Arms. As you can see in the image to the right, the Shield of the Royal Arms has been given a contemporary treatment and its whole has been cleverly split among all six denominations from the 1p to the 50p, with the £1 coin displaying the heraldic element in its entirety. This is the first time that a single design has been used across a range of United Kingdom coins. The new designs will enter circulation gradually throughout the year. It is normal practice for banks to order coins from the Royal Mint to satisfy public demand, which fluctuates over the course of the year. The current coin designs will remain in circulation and as legal tender for the foreseeable future. To mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering a range of magnificent limited-edition collections produced to Proof quality. The process of choosing the new designs to replace the familiar heraldic emblems on Britain's circulating coins began with a public competition. The comeptition generated more than 4,000 designs from over 500 people - the largest response to any public competition organised to change the British coinage. Specially invited artists, Royal Mint engravers and artists from other European countries vied with people of all ages and sections of society. The brief allowed those taking part a free hand to prepare a coherent series of designs' and while they were encouraged to explore heraldic emblems and motifs, the door was left open for other ways in which to symbolise Britain. Proof coins are produced to the highest quality. The modern minting process incorporates state-of-the-art technology as well as centuries-old hand skills of Royal Mint craftsmen, which are particularly important in the manufacture of the dies. Master tools are created with great care, minute details of the artist's design being perfected by experienced engravers. To achieve the superior quality of Proof coins, the die is sand blasted with fine particles to give a frosted finish. The surrounding table or field is then carefully hand-polished with diamond paste, a process that takes many hours and considerable skill, resulting in the mirror-like finish. Blanks for Proof coins must be completely free from any blemishes and are polished to a brilliant shine before each one is struck individually at least three times under tremendous pressure between the carefully prepared dies. Finally, each coin is meticulously inspected to ensure that only perfect specimens are placed into protective capsules and sent to collectors. The Royal Mint has issued a superb Brilliant Uncirculated Collection of 11 UK legal tender coins. At the heart of the collection are the new definitive coins by Matthew Dent, which form the shield of the Royal Arms. Bruce Rushin's familiar £2 technology coin, two commemorative £2 coins, one celebrating the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth and the other marking the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns, are also included together with the 50p piece commemorating the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. The coins are beautifully displayed in an informative and fully illustrated presentation folder detailing the history behind the coin designs. Set contains all UK definitive coins for 2009, including Bruce Rushin's £2 technology coin and three new commemorative coins Beautifully displayed in a colourful presentation folder which provides history behind the heraldry of UK coins The first time that the new definitive coins have appeared in a set with the commemorative issues. The perfect gift for anyone celebrating a special occasion in 2009, whether a birth, christening or anniversary, this unique coin collection will make a happy memento. BRITISH SILVER COINS. This year the Royal Mint has struck a 2009 dated £1 coin in sterling silver to superb Proof quality. This traditional yet contemporary coin is now available for individual purchase.The coin has been struck in sterling silver to Proof quality, the Royal Mint's highest standard The coin is new for 2009 Just 5,000 coins will be made available worldwide The reverse features the shield of the Royal Arms Beautifully presented in a black presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity, attesting to the low issue limit. The 2009 UK Shield of the Royal Arms £1 Silver Proof Coin is the ideal gift for a birthday, christening or an anniversary. In 2009 the most iconic of British cars, the Mini, is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The unique and revolutionary design by Alec Issigonis influenced a generation of carmakers. Over 50 million Minis have been sold worldwide and many ‘classic’ versions are still on the road and loved by their owners. To celebrate this very British anniversary, the Royal Mint has produced a £5 Proof coin in sterling silver and features on its reverse a side-view image of the classic Mini, created by David Cornell FRSA, FRBS. Struck in sterling silver to the highest quality of minting Features a design specially created for this anniversary with an inscription which reads ‘50th Anniversary of the first Mini’ Coin collectors and Mini enthusiasts alike will love this coin Housed in a black presentation case and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity telling the extraordinary story of the Mini and its quirky design features Just 2,000 coin collectors and Mini lovers worldwide will be able to own this edition of the silver Proof coin. The 2009 50th Anniversary of the Mini £5 Silver Proof Coin, struck for the Channel Island of Alderney, will make an interesting gift not just for coin collectors but also for Mini enthusiasts. Join in the 50 years of the Mini celebrations by owning this silver coin specially created for the occasion. The 2009 Britannia silver bullion £2 coin features the majestic figure of Britannia by award-winning sculptor Philip Nathan. The largest and purest legal tender coin of the UK, the £2 coin contains one ounce of fine silver. Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve Struck in Britannia silver to uncirculated quality, a higher standard than those found in your pocket Contains one ounce of fine silver The largest and purest legal tender silver coin of the realm Worldwide coin issue limit of 100,000. The 2009 silver bullion £2 Britannia is the ideal affordable gift of silver to give for birthdays, anniversaries or even graduations in 2009. British Silver Britannia British Silver Britannia is a unique fabrication of world renowned Royal Mint first introduced in 1998. The Britannia silver, an admixture of silver comprising 95.84% of silver, with the proportion copper metal is the main element of British Silver Britannia coins. This coin was introduced with the face value of two pounds. These coins bear Britannia standard silver impression and so are widely known as Britannia. The remarkable achievement of Britannia gold bullion coins motivated the Royal Mint to bring out silver bullion coin named British Silver Britannia. During the last few years Silver Britannia coins have come across in several enhancements of their pattern as well as in appearance to captivate the collectors as well as the investors. Each and every year , the pattern of this coin is being altered. GREAT BRITAIN 50th Anniversary of the Mini Alderney Coin Collection In 2009 the most iconic of British cars, the Mini, is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The unique and revolutionary design by Alec Issigonis influenced a generation of carmakers. Over 50 million Minis have been sold worldwide and many ‘classic’ versions are still on the road and loved by their owners. To celebrate this very British anniversary, the Royal Mint has produced a range of coins for the Channel Island of Alderney, featuring a reverse design of a side-view image of the classic Mini. The coinage of the United Kingdom is changing. Familiar designs that have served us well for almost 40 years will be replaced by a new set of designs, contemporary in treatment yet grounded in the traditions of the coinage. Now, in a new age, the time has come to rejuvenate the coinage by seeking designs that treat traditional symbols in an innovative and modern way. The series that has been chosen brings new life to the coinage and, like the decimal designs 40 years ago, draws inspiration from the very fabric of British history. The Royal Shield of Arms - The New Designs Revealed The Royal Mint is delighted to reveal to you the new designs that will appear on our coins. Individually, the coins focus on details of the shield of the Royal arms and when placed together they reveal the complete shield. View the new coin designs now Celebrate the Unveiling and Mark the End of an Era This is undoubtedly one of the most significant coin design changes in British history, and to mark this major numismatic milestone, the Royal Mint is offering an exciting range of limited-edition collections, giving collectors the opportunity to own a piece of numismatic history Collector Coin product range: Platinum Range 2008 Royal Shield of Arms Platinum Proof Collection Emblems of Britain and Royal Shield of Arms Platinum Proof Collection 2008 Emblems of Britain Platinum Proof Collection Gold Range 2008 Royal Shield of Arms Gold Proof Collection The Emblems of Britain and Royal Shield of Arms Gold Proof Collection 2008 Emblems of Britain Gold Proof Collection Silver Range 2008 Emblems of Britain Silver Proof Collection Base Metal Range 2008 Emblems of Britain 2008 Britannia - Defender of the ShoresWhen designer John Bergdahl was asked to interpret the iconic figure of Britannia, he produced four different drawings before finally, at the fifth, he arrived at a very personal image that sums up everything Britain means to him. His design, which appears on the reverse of the new limited-edition range of Britannia coins, shows, in John's words, 'a younger Britannia, and a warrior maiden at one with the elements, representing Britain.' One of a number of designers asked to put forward designs for the coin, John says it wasn't until the last of a series of drawings that the elements finally came together in the form subsequently chosen to appear on the coin. 'I tend to work out my ideas on paper,' he says. 'I prepared five drawings which I submitted, but it wasn't until the fifth that things started to gel. That one brought together all the things I wanted to say and felt about Britannia and about Britain.' The 2008 Britannia is commanding, standing proudly between land and sea with her face towards crested waves that are formed from her robes. To the right of her is featured a lighthouse, an image that traditionally appears on coinage designs of Britannia. For John, Britannia represents a nation with a rich maritime heritage. 'It is not just that we are surrounded by sea,' he says. 'The nation was forged from the sea in as much as the Romans, Danes, Vikings, Angles and Saxons all came here and made us what we are - we're a fairly diverse race. Britain is not just set in the sea, the British people are at one with the sea - that is where I came to with this particular Britannia. She comes from the waves and the waves become her.' These are not the ideas that the designer started out with - rather they crystallised as he worked. 'Things come to the surface as I draw,' says John. 'Then I start to realise where I'm going. It's almost like writing a character in a novel - they come to the point where the character starts to take over and narrates its own story.' John Bergdahl is a freelance designer and silversmith who trained as an heraldic engraver. He has been designing coins and medals since 1970. He has previously taken on commissions for the Royal Mint, but this is the first time one of his designs has appeared on legal tender coins of the United Kingdom. History of the Royal Mint - IntroductionTower of London From the end of the thirteenth century until the start of the nineteenth, the Royal Mint was located in the Tower of London. Stretched out in the narrow passage between the inner and outer walls, the Royal Mint occupied buildings which ran for 400 feet around the three sides of the fortress not bounded by the river. More > Tower Hill With additional space being required to allow the installation of steam-powered machinery, the Royal Mint left the Tower at the beginning of the nineteenth century and moved to a purpose-built facility on nearby Tower Hill. To the Royal Mint officers, accustomed to the cramped conditions in the Tower, the new site was 'simple, beautiful and effectual'. In the 1880s the factory buildings were reconstructed and extended. Further rebuilding was undertaken at the turn of the century with steam giving way to electricity. The work of construction and renovation became a continuous process as the Royal Mint endeavoured to cope with the enormous increase in its output. By the 1960s little of the original mint remained, apart from the dignified main building and the massive gatehouses which still stand today. Llantrisant The striking of more and more coins for overseas countries placed a tremendous strain upon the four-and-a-half acre Tower Hill site but it was the exceptionally large requirements arising from decimalisation that finally necessitated the building of a new mint. In accordance with government policy of moving industry away from the capital, several sites were considered in development areas including Cumbernauld near Glasgow, Runcorn on Merseyside and Washington in County Durham. The final decision, however, was in favour of Llantrisant in South Wales set in the rolling green countryside on the edge of the Rhondda Valley. The Royal Mint contributes to millions of lives every day, in the United Kingdom and around the world. At home it supplies the coins that are crucial to the daily transactions that underpin life, and as a profit-making Executive Agency of the British government it contributes to the public purse. As a manufacturer, exporter and employer it has a real stake in the industrial life of the nation, and as a maker of beautifully crafted collector coins it gives pleasure and opportunities to many. Beyond the United Kingdom the Royal Mint supplies some 100 issuing authorities around the world with coins and blanks. Blanks are metal discs, which are minted into coins. It is the leading export mint, with around 15 per cent of the worldwide market. With the Royal Mint's unique position comes responsibilities. The best customer service, the highest production standards and true shareholder values are watchwords for the business. The quest for continued and sustainable profits is led through winning new customers and pleasing existing clients, while at the same time reducing costs by making production more efficient and cutting out waste. The Royal Mint Celebrates 45oth Anniversary of Accession of Queen Elizabeth I The Royal Mint has unveiled a striking new design for a £5 crown minted especially to markthe 450th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth I's accession to the throne. Featuring a stunning portrait of one of history's greatest monarchs, this coin is certain to be sought after by collectors, especially as only a limited number will be available: 1,500 gold Proof crowns and 20,000 silver Proof crowns. The coin's designer, the renowned silversmith, Rod Kelly, has created a bold and highly decorative design which depicts Queen Elizabeth I, set within a symbolic Mandorla or 'almond like shape'. The Mandorla is often used in traditional Christian art to frame the figures of Christ or the Virgin Mary, while the almond seed is associated with divine virgin birth. Other beautifully rendered details such as the roses, the leaf pattern and the lettering also allude to Queen Elizabeth I's reign.The leaf design is deliberately reminiscent of the carvings made by Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, while he was awaiting execution in the Tower of London, and the Roman numerals mark the year of the Queen's accession 1558, and 2008 as the anniversary year.In addition, the inscription around the edge of the coin, 'I HAVE REIGNED WITH YOUR LOVE',is taken from Queen Elizabeth I's Golden Speech delivered to her last Parliament on 30 November 1601. Rod Kelly said: 'The portrait is a combination of several portraits, with the crown signifying a monarch, and the ruff, the dress and the face as painted by George Gower in 1588. The design encapsulates several of the important points established during Elizabeth's reign.' Dave Knight, Marketing Director of The Royal Mint said, 'The Elizabeth I Anniversary crown is a great memento that not only honours one of the most influential British monarchs, but also celebrates the start of one of the most remarkable periods in our country's history. We are delighted with Rod Kelly's design, which truly captures the essence of this extraordinary figure and her sovereignty.' The accession of Queen Elizabeth I was a key moment in history, marking the start of a 45-year reign, considered to be one of the most successful and glorious in English history.Deemed the Golden Age, it was a period when the arts and literature flourished, trade and industry thrived, and many successful voyages and discoveries were made by men like Francis Drake, Walter Raleigh and Humphrey Gilbert.Accession Day or Queen's Day was celebrated annually at Queen Elizabeth I's court with a series of elaborate festivals and continued to be a national holiday in England for 200 years. The 2008 Queen Elizabeth I £5 Crownis available in gold at £925.00 with a limited issue of 1,500,in silver at £39.95 with a limited issue of 20,000, and in base metal as a £2 Brilliant Uncirculated coin at £9.95, with a limited issue of 500,000.The obverse of the coin, common to all United Kingdom coinage,bears the portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS. The CollectionThe Royal Mint maintains one of the finest numismatic collections in the world. A living and working collection, it reflects the changing practical needs of the Royal Mint. The collection was established in 1816 by the Master of the Mint, William Wellesley Pole. One of his main objectives was to provide Royal Mint engravers with an inspirational source of material to which they could refer when preparing new coin designs. In 1818 the collection was greatly enhanced when the Royal Mint was presented with more than 2,000 coins and medals from the collection of the late Sarah Sophia Banks. The gift was a handsome one, from ancient British to contemporary machine-made coins, and it still forms the basis of the pre-1800 part of the Royal Mint collection. Today the collection contains approximately 70,000 coins including an abundance of proofs, patterns and trial pieces. Medals and seals are also well represented along with plaster models, electrotypes, balances, weights and numerous original drawings by numismatic artists. Above all, perhaps, it incorporates roughly 30,000 master tools and dies, a collection whose importance is unrivalled in the United Kingdom. Very much a part of the day-to-day activities at Llantrisant, the collection serves a variety of purposes within the Royal Mint. The Commemorative Coins Department, in particular, draws heavily upon the collection and the numismatic expertise of its staff to ensure that literature is accurate and well illustrated. Furthermore, to provide as complete a service as possible, the staff answers hundreds of enquiries every year from members of the public and delivers lectures on a regular basis to national and local numismatic societies. Although not open to members of the public, the collection is made accessible to numismatists and scholars by appointment. Furthermore, to ensure that material from the collection is seen by as many people as possible, items are frequently loaned for exhibitions at other museums and art galleries.

BRITISH GOLD COINS. The modern sovereign made its appearance in 1817 and came to be known as ‘the chief coin of the world’. Now, in 2009, the sovereign has again been struck in 22 carat gold using original nineteenth-century tools and featuring the classic portrayal of St George and the dragon. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time The sovereign unusually features Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the helmet minus its streamer Low issue limit of just 12,500 Presented in a walnut-veneer case with a numbered Certificate of Authenticity. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available struck to the highest Proof quality and presented in a case accompanied by a numbered Certificate of Authenticity attesting to the low issue of 12,500. The 2009 UK Gold Proof Sovereign is the ideal gift on the occasion of a special anniversary, important birthday or celebrating a graduation in 2009 For centuries gold has been praised for its beauty and value. Now the Royal Mint brings you an affordable way to appreciate its precious qualities with an opportunity to purchase the 2009 Gold Bullion Sovereign. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time in the modern production process The sovereign features Benedetto Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the same individual characteristics as the coins of the 1820s Struck in 22 carat gold to uncirculated quality Worldwide issue limit of 75,000 Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available within a specially designed outer sleeve to reflect the famous coin design of St George and the dragon. From the arrival of a baby, to a wedding, to retirement or special anniversary, a 2009 bullion sovereign from the Royal Mint makes an ideal and timeless gift of gold. Following its introduction in 2008, the new definitive £1 is now available individually. Struck to gold Proof quality, the coin is displayed in a walnut-veneer case. The coin has been struck in 22 carat gold to Proof quality, the Royal Mint's highest standard The coin is new for 2009 Only 1,000 gold Proof coins will be available worldwide Receive a Designing Change book, personally signed by the editor Dr Kevin Clancy, absolutely FREE when you purchase the £1 gold Proof Coin The reverse features the shield of the Royal Arms As a legal tender coin of the UK, the obverse features the current portrait of Her Majesty The Queen by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS Beautifully presented in a walnut-veneer presentation case and accompanied by an individually numbered Certificate of Authenticity. This beautiful gold coin will make the perfect gift for the extra special person in your life. It is also suitable for collectors who are interested in British coinage and its history. To celebrate the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns the Royal Mint is issuing a series of UK commemorative £2 coins. One of Scotland’s favourite sons, Robert Burns was a passionate poet and lyricist as well as a witty satirist of his religious and political peers. His most famous work is perhaps Auld Lang Syne, a song celebrating friendship and sung every year on New Year’s Eve in the English-speaking world. The coin has been struck to Proof quality - the Royal Mint’s highest standard The commemorative reverse features an extract from Auld Lang Syne, in Burns’ own handwriting As a legal tender coin of the UK, the obverse features the current portrait of Her Majesty The Queen by Ian Rank-Broadley FRBS Ideal to present as a gift. Anyone with an interest in the famous poet Robert Burns would be delighted to receive this coin to celebrate the 250th anniversary of his birth. It makes an ideal retirement or birthday gift as well as an anniversary gift. Struck in 22 carat gold, this beautiful half-sovereign embodies almost two centuries of numismatic tradition, making this limited-edition coin highly sought after. Original tools of the nineteenth century have been used unmodified for the first time in the modern production process The half-sovereign features Benedetto Pistrucci’s St George and the dragon with the same characteristics as the coins of 1893 Struck in 22 carat gold to uncirculated quality Worldwide issue limit of 50,000 Presented within a specially designed outer sleeve. This historic 22 carat gold coin is available within a specially designed outer sleeve to reflect the famous coin design of St George and the dragon. The 2009 bullion half-sovereign is the ideal gift on the occasion of a special anniversary, important birthday or celebrating a graduation in 2009. Sovereigns As Gold Bullion Ancient History When the world's first coins were produced in the seventh century B.C., they were simply a measured and guaranteed amount of precious metal, gold or silver, of a known purity. Almost three thousand years later, at the beginning of the twentieth century, the currency value of most coins was close to that of their intrinsic precious metal content , their bullion value. Gold has almost always been the preferred security for most currencies. Governments and central banks store much of their gold bullion in the form of 400 ounce bullion bars, but also maintain stocks of gold in the form of gold coins. The 20th Century For Great Britain, the obvious choice of bullion coin is the gold sovereign, and many other central and commercial banks keep a proportion of their gold bullion in the form of British gold sovereigns. The start of the first world war caused a major change in coins and currency the entire world over. Countries moved their currencies off the "gold standard". Within a decade, most countries converted to using paper money, and a token coinage, token meaning that the underlying bullion value would be much less than their face value. The Second Millennium It is only natural that at times of uncertainty, people everywhere seek to protect their assets from potential disasters. Whether it be fears of the millennium bug, worries about the "Euro", the end of the pound sterling, the collapse of the rouble, there are sound arguments for retaining at least a small proportion of surplus wealth in an ultra secure investment form. Gold has performed this traditional role since before the first coins came into existence. As one of the worlds oldest, most historic, and most recognisable gold coins, the gold sovereign makes an ideal bullion coin. Sovereigns weigh 7.98 grams and are made of 22 carat gold (carat means 1/24) or 91.66% pure, and therefore contains 7.315 grams or 0.2353544 troy ounces of pure gold. 2009 Gold Sovereigns The 2009 sovereigns are expected to have the familiar St. George and Dragon design. St. George and Dragon - Recut 2009 Reverse Dies The traditional St George & Dragon design has been used on sovereigns, with a few breaks, since 1817. During this long period, there have been a considerable number of minor changes to the dies used for the reverse (tail side). In 2007, the reverse design appears to have been completely re-engraved, although there was no advance announcement of this from the Royal Mint. The 2009 reverse dies have again been re-engraved, using "original Victorian tools". For details use the link from the heading of this paragraph. British Gold Sovereigns In 1816 the gold British Sovereign was first introduced, and as the British Empire expanded under Queen Victoria during the 1800’s, this coin came to be the world’s most widely distributed gold coin. Minted originally in London, the Sovereign came to be minted all over the world as Australia and South Africa came to be large gold producers. Mints in Pretoria, Bombay, Ottawa, Melbourne, Perth, and Sydney turned out hundreds of millions of Sovereigns during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Because of the huge output of gold Sovereigns at that time, and the fact that they have been traded and hoarded all over the world ever since, these roughly nickel-sized gold coins are available today at bullion prices. Although these coins are sometimes promoted as ‘scarce" and marked up outrageously by numismatic sales companies, in fact, they are currently available at bullion prices. These handsome coins portray the reigning monarch on one side, and Pestrucci's St. George and the Dragon on the other side. Gold Sovereigns were struck in the traditional 22karat (.917 fine gold) as were most gold coins made for circulation. The coins weigh 8 grams and contain just under a quarter-ounce of gold (.2354 troy ounce) As an international gold coin, the gold Sovereign has no equal. Whether in Cairo, Hong Kong, Beijing, Moscow, or nearly any spot on the globe, this coin commands instant recognition. Gold Coin Sets The First Coin Set In 1826, during the reign of George IV, a proof or specimen set of coins was issued, containing one example of each of the current coins. This included all four gold coin types, five pound, two pound, sovereign, and half sovereign. The five pound and two pound coins were only issued as proofs, none were issued for circulation. The sets also contained silver and copper coins. Although proof coins had been issued during the reign of George III, these appear to have been produced individually, and we are not aware of any complete proof "set" earlier than 1826. Special Occasions Only Proof sets continued to be issued, on very special and infrequent occasions, from 1826 to 1953. Sometimes these included complete ranges of gold, silver and copper or bronze coins, other sets were issued containing only gold coins, only silver coins, or various combinations. British Gold Sovereigns - Information 1489 or 1817 Although the first British gold sovereign was issued in 1489 for Henry VII, the modern gold sovereign commenced in 1817 under George III. A Real Coin The sovereign was a real circulating coin until the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. At about this time, most countries in the world reduced or stopped production of gold coins for circulation, and switched to a "token" coinage. By 1933, almost every country had stopped gold coin production, and it did not restart until about 1960. Even now, there are no countries where any gold coins regularly circulate as part of the coinage system. Sovereign Production Restarted The production of gold sovereigns, as bullion coins, restarted in 1957. There have been a number of breaks in production. Proofs From 1979, the Royal Mint started to produce special edition proof versions for collectors, and these are now likely to be produced every year. 2000 & The Third Millennium After a break from 1982, the Royal Mint has again started production of "ordinary" sovereigns in 2000, and it is possible that they too will be produced in following years.

MONNAIES DU MONDE

Royaume Uni - Brilliant Uncirculated Coin Set, 2015

The 2015 United Kingdom Definitive Coin Set. All eight definitive UK coins, from the 1p to the £2, are housed in an elegant stand-up case. One of the last sets to feature the fourth definitive portrait of The Queen.

Prix: 37,50 €